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Gearing DD- 710 - History

Gearing DD- 710 - History


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Gearing

Gearing (DD-710) was named for three generations of naval men. Henry Chalfant Gearing, born 10 June 1855 at Pittsburgh, Pa., graduated from the Naval Academy in 1876. Gearing served on various ships of the Navy during his early years, including Lackawana, Tuscarora, and Essex. He spent tours of duty at the Naval Academy and on board Glacier. After being promoted to Commander in 1905, Gearing commanded the naval stations at Cavite and Olongapo, P.I., until his retirement in 1909. He died 16 August 1926 at Charlottesville, Virginia.

Henry Chalfant Gearing, Jr., born 22 January 1887 at Boston, Massachusetts, graduated from the Naval Academy in 1907. He served on California, Illinois and other ships besides commanding a long list of destroyers, among them Woolsey, Dobbin, and Maury :He was appointed Captain in 1934. Subsequently, he commanded Destroyer Squadron 4 and Naval Training Station, San Diego, before his death 24 February 1944 at San Diego naval Hospital.

Henry Chalfant Gearing III, born 16 August 1912 at Vallejo, Calif., and graduated from the Naval Academy in 1936. After serving several ships as a young officer he joined Juneau as a Lieutenant in 1942, and was lost with his ship when it was torpedoed and .sunk in the Solomon Islands 13 November 1942.

(DD-710; dp. 2,425; 1. 390'6"; b. 40'10"; dr. 18'6", s. 34.6 k; cpl. 345; a. 6 5". 12 40mm., 2 21" tt., 6 dcp, 2 dct. cl. Gearing.)

Gearing (DD-710) was launched 18 February 1945 by the Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Kearny N J: sponsored by Mrs. Thomas M. Foley, daughter of Comdr. Gearing; and commissioned 3 May 1945, Commander T. H. Copeman in command.

After shakedown off Cuba, Gearing reached Norfolk; 22 July 1945 and trained precommisioning crews for other destroyers until putting in at Casco Bay. Maine, 5 October Celebration of Navy- Day from 26; to 29 October at New London, Conn., gave 5,000 citizen.s the chance to board the powerful destroyer. Subsequently Gearing put in at Pensacola, Fla., 4 November to screen carried Ranger during carrier qualification operations.

Returning to Norfolk 21 March 1946, she conducted peacetime operations along the Atlantic coast of North and South America, in the Caribbean. visiting Montevido. Uraguay; and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Gearing sailed 10 November 1947 on her first Mediterranean cruise, calling at Algeria, Malta, Italy, and France before mooring again at Norfolk 11 March 1948.

Peacetime operations along the eastern seaboard and in the Caribbean prepared her for a second cruise to European waters; the destroyer visited most of the nations washed by the Mediterranean from 10 November 1947 to 11 March 1948, and duplicated this long voyage from 4 January to 23 May 1949.

During the fall of 1949 Gearing took part in Operation Frostbite, an Arctic cruise test and development of cold weather techniques and equipment. She continued operations off the east coast of the United States and in the Caribbean through 1950. Another voyage 10 January to 17 May 1951, brought her from Norfolk to the Mediterranean and return; the remainder of the year was occupied by training cruises as far north as Halifax and south to Cuban waters.

By now Gearing had established the pattern of peacetime operations she followed well into the 1960's: "Med" cruises usually once a year, and exercise in the Atlantic and Caribbean. These kept her in fighting trim for the ceaseless duties of seapower. She was modernized and overhauled late 1961 through early 1962 at Boston.

In October 1962 Gearing took part in the American "quarantine" patrol against Cuba as the world trembled on the brink of war. This swift and classic use of power at sea solved the crisis. On 1 November Gearing returned to Norfolk. Through the remainder of 1962 she continued operations in the Atlantic.

After participating in Operation "Springboard-63" early in 1963, Gearing sailed for the Mediterranean in March serving with the 6th Fleet during the summer. She returned to Newport in September for a "FRAM I" overhaul. Following operations in the Caribbean and North Atlantic in the spring and summer of 1964, Gearing entered the Mediterranean 4 October to rejoin the 6th Fleet. After returning home early in 1960, she continued one rating in the Atlantic Fleet into 1967.


Gearing was launched on 18 February 1945 by the Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Kearny, New Jersey. Gearing was sponsored by Mrs. Thomas M. Foley, daughter of Commander Gearing and commissioned 3 May 1945 with Commander T. H. Copeman in command.

After shakedown off Cuba, Gearing reached Norfolk 22 July 1945 and trained precommisioning crews for other destroyers until putting in at Casco Bay, Maine, 5 October. Subsequently Gearing put in at Pensacola, Florida, 4 November to screen the aircraft carrier Ranger during carrier qualification operations.

Returning to Norfolk 21 March 1946, she conducted peacetime operations along the Atlantic coast of North and South America, in the Caribbean, visiting Montevideo, Uruguay and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Gearing sailed 10 November 1947 on her first Mediterranean cruise, [3] calling at Algeria, Malta, Italy, and France before mooring again at Norfolk 11 March 1948.

Peacetime operations along the eastern seaboard and in the Caribbean prepared her for a second cruise to European waters the destroyer visited most of the nations washed by the Mediterranean from 10 November 1947 to 11 March 1948 and duplicated this long voyage from 4 January to 23 May 1949.

During the fall of 1949 Gearing took part in Operation Frostbite, an Arctic cruise test and development of cold weather techniques and equipment. She continued operations off the east coast of the United States and in the Caribbean through 1950. Another voyage from 10 January to 17 May 1951 brought her from Norfolk to the Mediterranean and return the remainder of the year was occupied by training cruises as far north as Halifax and south to Cuban waters.

By now Gearing had established the pattern of peacetime operations she followed well into the 1960s: "Med" cruises usually once a year, and exercise in the Atlantic and Caribbean. These kept her in fighting trim for the ceaseless duties of seapower. She also took part in negotiations during the Santa Maria hijacking, and was modernized and overhauled late 1961 through early 1962 at Boston.

In October 1962 [4] Gearing took part in the American naval blockade of Cuba in response to Cuban Missile Crisis the basing of Soviet ballistic missiles on that island, and was the first to intercept a Soviet vessel. [2] After diplomatic negotiations ended this crisis, Gearing returned to Norfolk on 1 November 1962. Through the remainder of 1962 she continued operations in the Atlantic.

After participating in Operation "Springboard-63" early in 1963, Gearing sailed for the Mediterranean in March serving with the 6th Fleet during the summer. She returned to Newport in September for a "FRAM I" overhaul. Following operations in the Caribbean and North Atlantic in the spring and summer of 1964, Gearing entered the Mediterranean on 4 October to rejoin the 6th Fleet. After returning home early in 1965, she continued operating in the Atlantic Fleet into 1967.

She was decommissioned in 1973, stricken on 1 July 1973 and sold for scrap on 6 November 1974.


After shakedown off Cuba, Gearing reached Norfolk 22 July 1945 and trained precommissioning crews for other destroyers until putting in at Casco Bay, Maine, 5 October. Celebration of Navy Day from 26 to 29 October at New London, Connecticut, gave 5,000 citizens the chance to board the powerful destroyer. Subsequently Gearing put in at Pensacola, Florida, 4 November to screen carrier Ranger during carrier qualification operations.

Returning to Norfolk 21 March 1946, she conducted peacetime operations along the Atlantic coast of North and South America, in the Caribbean, visiting Montevideo, Uruguay and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Gearing sailed 10 November 1947 on her first Mediterranean cruise, calling at Algeria, Malta, Italy, and France before mooring again at Norfolk 11 March 1948.

Peacetime operations along the eastern seaboard and in the Caribbean prepared her for a second cruise to European waters the destroyer visited most of the nations washed by the Mediterranean from 10 November 1947 to 11 March 1948, and duplicated this long voyage from 4 January to 23 May 1949.

During the fall of 1949 Gearing took part in Operation Frostbite, an Arctic cruise test and development of cold weather techniques and equipment. She continued operations off the east coast of the United States and in the Caribbean through 1950. Another voyage 10 January to 17 May 1951 brought her from Norfolk to the Mediterranean and return the remainder of the year was occupied by training cruises as far north as Halifax and south to Cuban waters.

By now Gearing had established the pattern of peacetime operations she followed well into the 1960s: &ldquoMed&rdquo cruises usually once a year, and exercise in the Atlantic and Caribbean. These kept her in fighting trim for the ceaseless duties of sea power. She was modernized and overhauled late 1961 through early 1962 at Boston.

In October 1962 Gearing took part in the American &ldquoquarantine&rdquo patrol against Cuba as the world trembled on the brink of war. This swift and classic use of power at sea solved the crisis. On 1 November Gearing returned to Norfolk. Through the remainder of 1962 she continued operations in the Atlantic.

After participating in Operation &ldquoSpringboard-63&rdquo early in 1963, Gearing sailed for the Mediterranean in March, serving with the Sixth Fleet during the summer. She returned to Newport in September for a &ldquoFRAM I&rdquo overhaul. Following operations in the Caribbean and North Atlantic in the spring and summer of 1964, Gearing entered the Mediterranean 4 October to rejoin the Sixth Fleet. After returning home early in 1965, she continued operating in the Atlantic Fleet into 1967.

Decommissioned in 1970, Gearing was stricken from the Navy List 1 July 1973 and sold for scrap 6 November 1974.


USS Gearing (DD 710)

USS GEARING was the first of the 98 GEARING - class destroyers and the first ship in the Navy to bear the name. Throughout her 28 years of service, the GEARING was a member of the Atlantic Fleet and regularly deployed to the Mediterranean. Extensively converted as part of the Navy's FRAM I program from December 1961 - October 1962, the ship remained in service until decommissioned and stricken from the Navy list on July 2, 1973. The GEARING was sold for scrapping in November 1974 and was broken up in Chester, Penn.

General Characteristics: Awarded: 1942
Keel laid: August 10, 1944
Launched: February 18, 1945
Commissioned: May 3, 1945
Decommissioned: July 2, 1973
Builder: Federal Shipbuilding, Kearny, NJ
FRAM I Conversion Shipyard: Boston Naval Shipyard, Boston, Mass.
FRAM I Conversion Period: December 1961 - October 1962
Propulsion system: four boilers, General Electric geared turbines 60,000 SHP
Propellers: two
Length: 391 feet (119.2 meters)
Beam: 41 feet (12.5 meters)
Draft: 18.7 feet (5.7 meters)
Displacement: approx. 3,400 tons full load
Speed: 34 knots
Aircraft after FRAM I: two DASH drones
Armament after FRAM I: one ASROC missile launcher, two 5-inch/38 caliber twin mounts, Mk-32 ASW torpedo tubes (two triple mounts)
Crew after FRAM I: 14 officers, 260 enlisted

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS GEARING. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.

Accidents aboard USS GEARING:

USS GEARING was named for three generations of naval men. Henry Chalfant Gearing, born 9 June 1855 at Pittsburgh, Pa., graduated from the Naval Academy in 1876. Gearing served on various ships of the Navy during his early years, including LACKAWANA, TUSCARORA, and ESSEX. He spent tours of duty at the Naval Academy and on board GLACIER. After being promoted to Commander in 1905, Gearing commanded the naval stations at Cavite and Olongapo, P.I., until his retirement in 1909. He died 16 August 1926 at Charlottesville, Virginia.

Henry Chalfant Gearing, Jr., born 22 January 1887 at Boston, Massachusetts, graduated from the Naval Academy in 1907. He served on CALIFORNIA, ILLINOIS, and other ships besides commanding a long list of destroyers, among them WOOLSEY, DOBBIN, and MAURY. He was appointed Captain in 1934. Subsequently, he commanded Destroyer Squadron 4 and Naval Training Station, San Diego, before his death 24 February 1944 at San Diego Naval Hospital.

Henry Chalfant Gearing III was born 16 August 1912 at Vallejo, Calif., and graduated from the Naval Academy in 1935. After serving several ships as a young officer, he joined JUNEAU (CL 52) as a Lieutenant in 1942, and was lost with his ship when it was torpedoed and sunk in the Solomon Islands 13 November 1942.


The ship was completed on February 18, 1945 in Kearny, New Jersey . On May 3, 1945, Commander TH Copeman became the destroyer's first in command.

The Gearing did not take part in any combat operations during the Second World War. Until the early 1960s, the gearing served in several peaceful missions in the Atlantic (for example an operation in the Arctic to test the ship's sensitivity to cold). In October 1962 it became part of the US naval blockade of Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis . The Gearing was the first ship to intercept a Soviet transporter.

In September 1963 the gearing was fundamentally modernized as part of FRAM I. Ten years later it was decommissioned.

The gearing was mainly used in the western Atlantic, the Caribbean and the Mediterranean.


Optimal Configuration

Similar to Benson and Fletcher, Gearing can be tailored to maximize either her torpedo armament or main battery guns. Most players will opt to maximize the damage output of her main battery given that this is already her strongest armament.

Upgrades

The recommended upgrades for Gearing are fairly obvious choices, and largely self-explanatory:

  • Slot 1: Main Armaments Modification 1 ( )
  • Slot 2: Engine Room Protection ( ) *
  • Slot 3: Aiming Systems Modification 1 ( ) *
  • Slot 4: Propulsion Modification 1 ( )
  • Slot 5: Concealment System Modification 1 () *
  • Slot 6: See below.

Slot 3 offers either Aiming Systems Modification 1 ( ), Torpedo Tubes Modification 1 ( ) or AA Guns Modification 1 ( ) none of them are bad choices. AA Guns Modification 1 is recommended for captains who wish to equip Defensive AA Fire () and play a larger role in assisting friendly capital ships from fending off enemy aircraft. Many captains will opt to leave their AA guns disabled most of the time — for stealth — and plug Aiming Systems Modification 1 into this slot. Similarly, Defensive AA Fire Modification 1 ( ) is available in Slot 2 in order to maximize Gearing’s anti-aircraft role. Torpedo Tubes Modification 1 in this slot will help counteract some of the negative effects of equipping Torpedo Tubes Modification 2 ( ) in Slot 6.

Slot 5 offers the default option of Concealment System Modification 1, while players who sink the time into obtaining Gearing’s unique upgrade, Improved Hull Concealment ( ), may opt to install it as well. It offers greater concealment bonuses than Concealment System Modification 1 (), but also decreases the reload speed of main guns, shifting the ship more towards the usage of stealth and torpedoes. It does not exclude the relevant choice in Slot 6 though, so the negative effects can be offset by the upgrade chosen for that slot.

The upgrade chosen for Slot 6 will largely determine how Gearing plays.

Main Battery (Maximum Rate of Fire) Build: One popular build for Gearing captains is to stack buffs to her main battery rate of fire. From an upgrade perspective, this means plugging Main Battery Modification 3 ( ) into the final upgrade slot when paired with Level 3 commander skill Basic Firing Training, it drops her reload speed to a mind-numbing 2.4 seconds.

Main Battery (Maximum Range) Build: Also worth considering is the ability to stack Gun Fire Control System Modification 2 ( ) with the Level 4 commander skill Advanced Firing Training and push Gearing’s main battery range well past 15 km. It is worth noting that shell flight times at such ranges are extreme and landing hits against anything but slow-moving battleships will be incredibly challenging.

Torpedo Build: A less popular — but no less potent — Gearing build is to buff her torpedo reload time by stacking Torpedo Tubes Modification 2 ( ) in Slot 6 with the Level 3 commander skill Torpedo Armament Expertise. Combined, these upgrades significantly improve Gearing’s torpedo reload time.

Commander Skills

The following information is provided for players who wish to create a permanent captain for the ship. Those players who are retraining captains or using the ship to gain extra experience for a captain should consult the page relevant to the ship to which the captain will be assigned.


Gearing DD- 710 - History

The Gyatt, a Gearing (DD 710) class destroyer, weighed 2425 tons (3300 tons fully loaded), had a length of 390 feet six inches, a beam of 40 feet ten inches and a maximum draft of 19 feet. This class destroyer was the USS Sumner (DD 692) class extended by fourteen feet to allow for additional fuel storage and consequently greater range. However, the extension reduced the overall speed for the Gearing class destroyers by approximately three knots per hour, to an estimated 35 knots. The two classes of destroyers (Gearing and Sumner) were so similar that the designers did not bother to change the frame numbers. Instead, they assigned letters to the frames added amidships. The crew for this class destroyer was eleven officers and 325 enlisted men.

The original armament on the Gyatt consisted of three twin 5-inch 38 caliber guns, two quad 40mm guns, two twin 40mm guns, ten 20mm guns, two sets of five 21-inch torpedoes, six K-guns for 300 pound depth charges and two stern racks for 600 pound depth charges. In place of the aft set of five torpedoes, the Gyatt and many others of the Gearing class received a third quad 40mm gun. In later years, various weapons were removed and others added, such as the removal of the 20mm guns and the addition of hedgehogs in 1950, and the removal of the aft quad 40mm gun and aft 5-inch gun mount to allow for the addition of Terrier missiles in 1956.

The ship had four boilers and geared turbines that produced 60,000 horsepower and generated a speed in excess of 35 knots. It is understood that the Gyatt in late 1945 set a long distance speed record for destroyers of its class. The Gyatt maintained, for an extended period of time, a speed of 31.8 knots per hour. In 1946, on a run from Norfolk to Boston, the Gyatt was the only ship in Destroyer Squadron Four (DesRon 4) to sustain a speed of 38 knots that had been reached by the Gearing (DD 710), Greene (DD 711), and Bailey (DD 713).


Gearing DD- 710 - History

A Tin Can Sailors
Destroyer History

USS TIMMERMAN
(
EDD-828/EAG-152 )

The Last Gearing
By Chic Sale

After reading in the July Issue of the Tin Can Sailor about the Mighty Gearings and the featuring of the first of the class, USS GEARING (DD-710), it seems appropriate to follow with a description of the last ship of the class, USS TIMMERMAN (EDD-828) and later (EAG-152).

The TIMMERMAN almost did not make it into this world. Her keel was laid on 01 October 1945, and at that time, she was intended to be just another standard destroyer of the class. On 07 January 1946, the Bureau of Ships ordered work suspended and what there was of her was transferred to the reserve fleet. This was remarkable due to the fact that many ships were cancelled and subsequently scrapped on the building ways.

Advanced machinery design had been on the minds of planners for years. During World War II, work had been done in this area and plans had been made to produce an advanced propulsion system and install it in a Fletcher Class hull. However, at the conclusion of the War, there were no Fletcher hulls available. The Fletcher hull was 376' 6" in length and 39'8" at the beam. The Sumner hull was the same length and 10" broader at the beam. The Gearing hull was the same as the Sumner except for the 14' length added amidships for fuel. This simply meant that a Fletcher hull and a Gearing hull were almost identical, most importantly in the machinery spaces.

On 24 May 1946, the U.S. Navy contracted to complete the TIMMERMAN as an advanced design destroyer. There were many delays due to design, research and development and she was not launched until 19 May 1951 - almost five years.

When commissioned on 26 September 1952, the U.S. Navy had one of their first completely experimental ships. Her propulsion system was rated at 100,000 Shaft Horsepower and a speed of 43 knots was anticipated. Naval records do not show that she ever exceeded 35 knots, but strong evidence indicates that the 43 knots was achieved and perhaps even exceeded during sea trials prior to commissioning.

Outwardly, there were several similarities between the TIMMERMAN and her sister Gearings. She had the standard 5" 38 cal. main battery, air and surface search radars and fire control radar. After that, it was difficult to find many more similarities.

The bow was raised a full two feet at the stem and faired into the sheer at frame 43. Mount 51 was moved aft seven feet. These two measures were intended to improve sea-keeping qualities, especially in view of the higher anticipated speeds. The standard Sumners and Gearings were notoriously "wet" forward and often Mount 51 would be damaged in a heavy sea. Lightweight Danforth anchors were recessed into the deck edge adding to the reduction of weight forward.

The superstructure was aluminum and there were "no expansion joints." One side was bolted and riveted and the other welded to test fabrication methods and structural stability.

The main battery of 5" 38's was the only armament on board TIMMERMAN. There were no torpedoes, Hedgehogs or depth charges. Because she was intended to be completely experimental, these weapons were not considered necessary and their omission added to the weight reduction program.

The propulsion system was the real experiment. The forward plant was 875 psi, 1050 degrees Fahrenheit and the after plant was 2000 lb. psi, 1050 degrees Fahrenheit. As was expected there were many problems related to the experimental machinery and many months were spent dockside while repairing or replacing the newly designed equipment that failed. The electrical system was 1000 volt, 400 cycle as compared to the 440 volt 60 cycle system of most other Navy ships. There were many electrical problems as well, mainly due to the higher rotative speeds of the electric motors. In a special compartment on the 01 level, forward of #2 stack, there was a motor generator set for the purpose of receiving shore power. The unit consisted of a 440 volt 60 cycle motor, which drove a 1000 volt 400 cycle generator.

The 14 foot section amidships, which was intended for fuel on a standard Gearing, was on TIMMERMAN a laboratory of gauges, test equipment and recording devices. The instrumentation in this space was subjected to undesirable vibration whenever the main batteries were fired.

On 11 January 1954, TIMMERMAN was reclassified as (EAG-152) and later her main battery was removed and replaced by concrete blocks to compensate for the weight loss. Also removed at a later date were the air search and fire control radars giving her a most unusual configuration.

The TIMMERMAN was a successful experiment in many ways. She proved that higher steam pressures and temperatures were possible, thus allowing for the development of the 1200 psi plant, which was first installed in the USS FOREST SHERMAN (DD-931) class and other later classes of ships. One of her emergency generators was driven by a gas turbine engine, believed to be one of the first marine installations of a gas turbine. There were other contributions to future ship design such as the aluminum super-structure, raised bow and other experiments, which were classified at the time.

Her short life of 46 months was a productive one. She was decommissioned on 27 July 1956 and sold for scrap on 21 April 1959.

From The Tin Can Sailor, January 1992


Copyright 2001 Tin Can Sailors.
All rights reserved.
This article may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from
Tin Can Sailors.


Gearing DD- 710 - History

(DD-710 dp. 2,425 l. 390'6" b. 40'10" dr. 18'6", s. 34.6 k cpl. 345 a. 6 5". 12 40mm., 2 21" tt., 6 dcp, 2 dct. cl. Gearing.)

Gearing (DD-710) was launched 18 February 1945 by the Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Kearny N J: sponsored by Mrs. Thomas M. Foley, daughter of Comdr. Gearing and commissioned 3 May 1945, Commander T. H. Copeman in command.

After shakedown off Cuba, Gearing reached Norfolk 22 July 1945 and trained precommisioning crews for other destroyers until putting in at Casco Bay. Maine, 5 October Celebration of Navy- Day from 26 to 29 October at New London, Conn., gave 5,000 citizens the chance to board the powerful destroyer. Subsequently Gearing put in at Pensacola, Fla., 4 November to screen carrier Ranger during carrier qualification operations.

Returning to Norfolk 21 March 1946, she conducted peacetime operations along the Atlantic coast of North and South America, in the Caribbean. visiting Montevido. Uraguay and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Gearing sailed 10 November 1947 on her first Mediterranean cruise, calling at Algeria, Malta, Italy, and France before mooring again at Norfolk 11 March 1948.

Peacetime operations along the eastern seaboard and in the Caribbean prepared her for a second cruise to European waters the destroyer visited most of the nations washed by the Mediterranean from 10 November 1947 to 11 March 1948, and duplicated this long voyage from 4 January to 23 May 1949.

During the fall of 1949 Gearing took part in Operation Frostbite, an Arctic cruise test and development of cold weather techniques and equipment. She continued operations off the east coast of the United States and in the Caribbean through 1950. Another voyage 10 January to 17 May 1951, brought her from Norfolk to the Mediterranean and return the remainder of the year was occupied by training cruises as far north as Halifax and south to Cuban waters.

By now Gearing had established the pattern of peacetime operations she followed well into the 1960's: "Med" cruises usually once a year, and exercise in the Atlantic and Caribbean. These kept her in fighting trim for the ceaseless duties of seapower. She was modernized and overhauled late 1961 through early 1962 at Boston.

In October 1962 Gearing took part in the American "quarantine" patrol against Cuba as the world trembled on the brink of war. This swift and classic use of power at sea solved the crisis. On 1 November Gearing returned to Norfolk. Through the remainder of 1962 she continued operations in the Atlantic.

After participating in Operation "Springboard-63" early in 1963, Gearing sailed for the Mediterranean in March serving with the 6th Fleet during the summer. She returned to Newport in September for a "FRAM I" overhaul. Following operations in the Caribbean and North Atlantic in the spring and summer of 1964, Gearing entered the Mediterranean 4 October to rejoin the 6th Fleet. After returning home early in 196a, she continued operating in the Atlantic Fleet into 1967.


Welcome to the USS Gearing DD-710 Guestbook Forum

Navy Emporium
Please view our commemorative USS Gearing DD-710 products in our Ship's Store!

David Flynn
Years Served: 3
June 1965-February 1968

Jim Hoeschen SN
Years Served: 1962 - 1964
I wish it could've lasted longer great times.

H.P.Smith,MM3
Years Served: Dec.1954-Jan.1957
My first ship and the best ship in the fleet. Served in the aft. engine room.

Years Served: 1953--1955 Served as EM3
I had the best time of my life, and the crew was the best crew barring none, I salute and take my hat off to them one and all God bless every one of them.

Ray Tippett
Years Served: Two
man On this ship I learned discipline and matured from a boy to a,
I served in the aft engine room with Chief Slater. I used my GI Bill
to attend collega and became a Physical Therapist The best Squad Dog
in the navy

Qm1 Walter F Hummel USN R
Years Served: Myles C Fox DD-829 66-67
I didn't serve in the gearing but on the Myles C Fox DD-829 but always happy to sign any other gearing class guestbook . walt f hummel qm1 usn ret

Parker Remes
Years Served: 1951 - 1955
I served in AFT engine room. My rank MM2, served under chief Gavin.
Most of my buddies are deceased by now (Ed Reinhardt, Robert Albig, William Long). I retired to Florida's West Coast.

Steve Gross, YN2
Years Served: 1969-1970
Good Ship, good times. Med Cruise '69, GTMO '70, Newport, New London and Block Island!!

John A. Donaubauer EM2
Years Served: 1953-1956
Best ship,great crew

Robert Tucker
Years Served: 1
I was only aboard about a year from about 1972 to about Nov. 1973. I was an SN working as a boatswains mate but had passed my test for CM3.

Charlie Gierhart
Years Served: 1968-1972
worked on asroc deck as gm

Jesse E Cranford Jr GMG1
Years Served: Sept 1967 To April 1970
I enjoyed my time on the ship and met a lot of great people.

Terry K. Martin ET1
Years Served: 1960-61
A super ship where all the crew got along with one another. Help was never far away. You were never alone!


Watch the video: World of Warships Blitz - USS Gearing review (November 2022).

DateWhereEvents
July 11, 1959Chesapeake Bay, Va.