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General William Mitchell AP-114 - History

General William Mitchell AP-114 - History


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General William Mitchell

William Lendrum Mitchell, born in 1879 in Nice, France, enlisted in the Army as a private in 1898 and served in the Philippines during the Spanish-American War. After return to the United States, he led in the precarious construction of a telegraph network in Alaska, and then pioneered in U.S. Army aviation. He rapidly rose in rank, and, when he commanded the U.S. air forces in France in World War I, he was promoted Brigadier General. After the war, General "Billy" Mitchell was made Director of Military Aviation in the U.S. Army and argued violently for a large, independent air force. His caustic-public criticism of military and naval leaders led to his court-martial in 1926. After resignation, General Mitchell remained a bitter critic of Army and government policy. He died in 1936.

(AP-114, dp. 11,450 (It.), 622'7", b. 76'6", dr. 25'6" s. 20.6 k; cpl. 452; trp. 5,289; a. 4 5", 16 1.1", 20 20mm.; cl. General John Pope, T. P2 S2-R2)

General William Mitchell (AP-114) was launched 31 October 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract by the Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.,Kearny, N.J. sponsored by Mrs. William Mitchell, the namesake's widow, acquired 15 January 1944 and commissioned 4 days later, Captain Henry Coyle, USCG, in command.

From 3 March-20 August 1944 General William Mitchell made five round trip transport voyages out of Norfolk and New York to Casablanca and Liverpool, carrying fighting men to the North African theater and participating in the buildup prior to the Allied invasion of Northern France On the return leg of these frequent voyages, she carried casualties and rotation troops home to the United States, insuring a steady flow of men and equipment between America and war-torn Europe.

During the autumn of 1944 and through the spring of 1945, General William Mitchell called twice at Bombay, India, as she redeployed and rotated troops in the China Burma-India theater. On the first of these voyages she sailed from New York via Panama and Australia, putting in at Bombay 7 October and embarking veterans for passage to Australia and America, and finally mooring at San Diego 17 November 1944. Her second passage to India took her from San Pedro via Tasmania to embark Allied troops and Italian prisoners of war at Bombay; she subsequently off-loaded the POW's at Melbourne and returned to San Pedro 3 March 1945.

The ship then brought troops from San Francisco to Espiritu Santo, Guadalcanal, Manus, and Leyte as the European war neared conclusion and the Pacific theater gained priority, General William Mitchell sailed to Leghorn and Naples, Italy, to transport seasoned fighting men and redeploy them for the anticipated assault on Japan's homeland. These troops debarked at Ulithi and the Philippines in the summer of 1945, and the ship returned to San Francisco 6 December 1945 at war's end filled with homeward-bound warriors.

As part of the "Magic-Carpet" fleet, this busy transport carried bluejackets from San Francisco to the Philippines returning servicemen from Hollandia to Seattle, and troops from the Philippines and Guam to San Francisco, through the spring of 1946. Subsequently, from April 1946 until 1949 General Mitchell sailed from West Coast ports and shuttled troops and supplies to and from Japan, China, Guam, and Hawaii. She underwent alterations for peacetime service at the Philadelphia Navy Yard in March 1947 and then returned to San Francisco and her transpacific schedule.

In October 1949 she was transferred to MSTS and in 1950 continued her West Coast-Orient travels. In that year, too, two round trip voyages from New Orleans and New York were made to Bremerhaven to rotate and supply troops in Europe. She made an around-the-world cruise out of New York in the summer of 1951, visiting Germany, North Africa, Ceylon, IndoChina, Korea, and Japan before mooring at San Francisco 26 September 1951.

General William Mitchell continued to transport men and material from West Coast ports to Japan and Korea, supporting the United Nations forces in the latter country. Her frequent shuttle runs followed this pattern with the addition of numerous calls at Formosa and Pacific Islands until returned to the Maritime Administration 1 December 1966. General William Mitchell entered the National Defense Reserve Fleet and is berthed in Suisan Bay, Calif.


General William Mitchell AP-114 - History

From: Dictionary of American Fighting Ships

William Lendrum Mitchell, born in 1879 in Nice, France, enlisted in the Army as a private in 1898 and served in the Philippines during the Spanish-American War. After return to the United States, he led in the precarious construction of a telegraph network in Alaska, and then pioneered in U.S. Army aviation. He rapidly rose in rank, and, when he commanded the U.S. air forces in France in World War I, he was promoted Brigadier General. After the war, General "Billy" Mitchell was made Director of Military Aviation in the U.S. Army and argued violently for a large, independent air force. His caustic-public criticism of military and naval leaders led to his court-martial in 1926. After resignation, General Mitchell remained a bitter critic of Army and government policy. He died in 1936.

(AP - 114: dp. 11,450 (lt.) l. 622'7" b. 75'6" dr. 25'6" s. 20.6 k cpl. 452 trp. 5,289 a. 4 5", 16 1.1", 20 20mm. cl. General John Pope T. P2 S2-R2)

General William Mitchell (AP-114) was launched 31 October 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract by the Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Kearny, N.J. sponsored by Mrs. William Mitchell, the namesake's widow acquired 15 January 1944 and commissioned 4 days later, Captain Henry Coyle, USCG, in command.

From 3 March-20 August 1944 General William Mitchell made five round trip transport voyages out of Norfolk and New York to Casablanca and Liverpool, carrying fighting men to the North African theater and participating in the buildup prior to the Allied invasion of Northern France. On the return leg of these frequent voyages, she carried casualties and rotation troops home to the United States, insuring a steady flow of men and equipment between America and war-torn Europe.

During the autumn of 1944 and through the spring of 1945, General William Mitchell called twice at Bombay, India, as she redeployed and rotated troops in the China-Burma-India theater. On the first of these voyages she sailed from New York via Panama and Australia, putting in at Bombay 7 October and embarking veterans for passage to Australia and America, and finally mooring at San Diego 17 November 1944. Her second passage to India took her from San Pedro via Tasmania to embark Allied troops and Italian prisoners of war at Bombay she subsequently off-loaded the POW's at Melbourne and returned to San Pedro 3 March 1945.

The ship then brought troops from San Francisco to Espiritu Santo, Guadalcanal, Manus, and Leyte as the European war neared conclusion and the Pacific theater gained priority, General William Mitchell sailed to Leghorn and Naples, Italy, to transport seasoned fighting men and redeploy them for the anticipated assault on Japan's homeland. These troops debarked at Ulithi and the Philippines in the summer of 1945, and the ship returned to San Francisco 6 December 1945 at war's end filled with homeward-bound warriors.

As part of the "Magic-Carpet" fleet, this busy transport carried bluejackets from San Francisco to the Philippines, returning servicemen from Hollandia to Seattle, and troops from the Philippines and Guam to San Francisco, through the spring of 1946. Subsequently, from April 1946 until 1949 General [William] Mitchell sailed from West Coast ports and shuttled troops and supplies to and from Japan, China, Guam, and Hawaii. She underwent alterations for peacetime service at the Philadelphia Navy Yard in March 1947 and then returned to San Francisco and her transpacific schedule.

In October 1949 she was transferred to MSTS and in 1950 continued her West Coast-Orient travels. In that year, too, two round trip voyages from New Orleans and New York were made to Bremerhaven to rotate and supply troops in Europe. She made an around-the-world cruise out of New York in the summer of 1951, visiting Germany, North Africa, Ceylon, Indochina, Korea, and Japan before mooring at San Francisco 26 September 1951.

General William Mitchell continued to transport men and material from West Coast ports to Japan and Korea, supporting the United Nations forces in the latter country. Her frequent shuttle runs followed this pattern with the addition of numerous calls at Formosa and Pacific Islands until returned to the Maritime Administration 1 December 1966. General William Mitchell entered the National Defense Reserve Fleet and is berthed in Suisan Bay [sic Suisun Bay], Calif.


USS William Mitchell AP-114

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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. C. Peter Chen says:
1 Sep 2008 03:28:06 PM

In this photo, the USS General William Mitchell was embarking the 3,500 USMC veterans of Guadalcanal and Peleliu actions.

2. maxine kirkpatrick says:
3 Feb 2013 04:09:36 PM

I went with a sailir named Roy owen blankenship from 1944 till 1948. served on general mitchell ap 114.love of my life.

All visitor submitted comments are opinions of those making the submissions and do not reflect views of WW2DB.


General William Mitchell AP-114 - History

The booklet measures 7-1/2'' x 5-1/4''. It is in excellent condition as pictured. Below here is much additional background information that was found online:

''AP-114 USS General William Mitchell''

*General class Transport:
*Displacement: 19,660 tons (full load)
*Length: 623'
*Beam: 75ƌ"
*Draft: 25'
*Speed: 21 knots (max), 8-11 knots (econ)
*Armament: 4 5"/38 DP, 4x2 40mm, 18x2 20mm
*Complement: 452
*Troop capacity: 5,650
*Geared-turbine engines, twin screws, 17,000 h.p.
*Federal, Kearny, and commissioned 19 January 1944

''General William Mitchell (AP-114) was launched 31 October 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract by the Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Kearny, N.J. sponsored by Mrs. William Mitchell, the namesake's widow acquired 15 January 1944 and commissioned 4 days later, Captain Henry Coyle, USCG, in command.''

''From 3 March-20 August 1944 General William Mitchell made five round trip transport voyages out of Norfolk and New York to Casablanca and Liverpool, carrying fighting men to the North African theater and participating in the buildup prior to the Allied invasion of Northern France. On the return leg of these frequent voyages, she carried casualties and rotation troops home to the United States, insuring a steady flow of men and equipment between America and wartorn Europe.''

''During the autumn of 1944 and through the spring of 1945, General William Mitchell called twice at Bombay, India, as she redeployed and rotated troops in the China-Burma-India theater. On the first of these voyages she sailed from New York via Panama and Australia, putting in at Bombay 7 October and embarking veterans for passage to Australia and America, and finally mooring at San Diego 17 November 1944. Her second passage to India took her from San Pedro via Tasmania to embark Allied troops and Italian prisoners of war at Bombay she subsequently off-loaded the POWs at Melbourne and returned to San Pedro 3 March 1945.''

''The ship then brought troops from San Francisco to Espiritu Santo, Guadalcanal, Manus, and Leyte as the European war neared conclusion and the Pacific theater gained priority. General William Mitchell sailed to Leghorn and Naples, Italy, to transport seasoned fighting men and redeploy them for the anticipated assault on Japan's homeland. These troops debarked at Ulithi and the Philippines in the summer of 1945, and the ship returned to San Francisco 6 December 1945 at war's end filled with homeward-bound warriors.''

''As part of the "Magic-Carpet" fleet, this busy transport carried bluejackets from San Francisco to the Philippines, returning servicemen from Hollandia to Seattle, and troops from the Philippines and Guam to San Francisco through the spring of 1946. Subsequently, from April 1946 until 1949 General Mitchell sailed from West Coast ports and shuttled troops and supplies to and from Japan, China, Guam, and Hawaii. She underwent alterations for peacetime service at the Philadelphia Navy Yard in Mach 1947 and then returned to San Francisco and her transpacific schedule.''

''In October 1949 she was transferred to MSTS and in 1950 continued her West Coast-Orient travels. in that year, too, two round trip voyages from New Orleans and New York were made to Bremerhaven to rotate and supply troops n Europe. She made an around-the-world cruise out of New York in the summer of 1951, visiting Germany, North Africa, Ceylon, Indochina, Korea, and Japan before mooring at San Francisco 26 September 1951.''


USS William T. Mitchell TAP114

Mom and I sailed from Fort Mason on Friday, March 13 (yes!) 1953 aboard USS General William Mitchell for Yokohama when I was 8 years old. Dad piloted B-26s in Europe in WWII and remained in the reserves afterwards. He was called up and served for a year in Korea in intelligence and then decided to make the Air Force a career and was transferred to Johnson Air Base in Japan, so Mom and I were off to join him. I remember no names of crew or other passengers, and I so wish I did. I'll ramble a bit about how much I enjoyed that voyage.

First night out, after under the glorious Golden Gate: The dreaded ground swells! We were at a table for several, with an Army Major at the head of the table. It was rolling enough that several people ate little and left early, but I was ravenous and ate and ate. Mom began feeling queasy and she left for our cabin, after asking the Major if he would mind keeping an eye on me. He graciously agreed, so I ate more, I think multiple desserts, while plates and cutlery crashed to the deck from several tables during some really heavy rolls, and the crew were busily cleaning up the mess, and the Major calmly smoked and drank more coffee with a smile on his face, which I later realized was most likely at my capacity for food. I ate long enough that we finaly were the last two in the mess, and we eventually tip-toed our way out of the mess through the broken china on the deck.

I've often thought of how well all the crew seemed to at least tolerate us brats, but I don't remember any who weren't always nice to us. I still have images of the "canteen" (my term - can't remember what Navy would term it), leather-tooling, and the wardroom for us dependents.

We could get snacks and toiletries, etc, at the canteen, but I most remember that was my first taste of Hawaiian Punch! and I loved it. (I've researched Hawaiian Punch, and it was first marketed on the West Cost and hadn't yet made it to Dallas before our voyage.)

The leather-working was a great idea - it kept us kids stationary for a couple of hours. A sailor would patiently teach us how to use punches to tool leather, and I made a belt for myself and a wallet for Mom.

Ah, the wardroom. Couches and plenty of board games to keep us kids occupied. I know at least some kids got seasick, but I never did on the entire trip, and more moms seemed to get queasy and retire to their cabins than kids. That meant that during rough seas eventually the critical ratio of moms to kids became low enough that we kids took control of the whole place. We learned that bouncing off a couch just as the ship began rising from a low swell meant a MUCH higher soar than usual. If we got too rowdy for the moms we'd go out into a passageway and find a handrail to hold and jump up with the same timing. Until a crew member came along to shoo us off.

I have one image of the Line-crossing celebration, of Mom and me standing at a railing looking down at some partying going on on the aft deck, but Mom removed me shortly. I do remember a classmate in Japan who had crossed the Dateline on his birthday, though I don't remember on which ship. He told the story of the crew making him the honorary King Neptune and cheering in his honor, which I think was just great of the crew, though I suspect he was also bundled off shortly to make way for some more bawdy partying.

After a year and a half in Japan, we sailed from Yokohama for Seattle in October, 1954, on USS Mann, though with a stop in Pusan to debark troops and pick up more for return to the States. The "police action" was over by then, but I remember sticking my head out our cabin porthole to watch the troops tromp slowly down the ramp to the shore, but later seeing smiling boarders walk much faster up the ramp to board. I remember that crossing less well, save for one day when Dad was Officer of the Day, and he took me down to troop quarters to walk through with him on "inspection", which mainly consisted of a sort of meet-and-greet. I remember shaking hands with several of them, and of course all of them were elated to be going home.

I've long wished I'd kept a journal of our crossing on Mitchell, so I could have recorded the names of so many, to later be able to track down the Major and laugh with him about my appetite, and the guys who ran the canteen, and the mess crew who took care of us - and the messes - so well at meals, and the sailors who taught me how to tool leather. Great memories.


Description

This photo of USS General William Mitchell AP 114 is exactly as you see it with the matte printed around it. You will have the choice of two print sizes, either 8″x10″ or 11″x14″. The print will be ready for framing, or you can add an additional matte of your own choosing then you can mount it in a larger frame. Your personalized print will look awesome when you frame it.

We can PERSONALIZE your print of the USS General William Mitchell AP 114 with your name, rank and years served and there is NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE for this option. After you place your order you can simply email us or indicate in the notes section of your payment what you would like printed. For example:

United States Navy Sailor
YOUR NAME HERE
Proudly Served: Your Years Here

This would make a nice gift for yourself or that special Navy veteran you may know, therefore, it would be fantastic for decorating the home or office wall.

The watermark “Great Naval Images” will NOT be on your print.

Media Type Used:

The USS General William Mitchell AP 114 photo is printed on Archival-Safe Acid-Free canvas using a high-resolution printer and should last many years. The unique natural woven texture canvas offers a special and distinctive look that can only be captured on canvas. Most sailors loved his ship. It was his life. Where he had a tremendous responsibility and lived with his closest shipmates. As one gets older, the appreciation for the ship and the Navy experience will get stronger. The personalized print shows ownership, accomplishment and an emotion that never goes away. When you walk by the print you will feel the person or the Navy experience in your heart.

We have been in business since 2005 and our reputation for having great products and customer satisfaction is indeed exceptional. You will, therefore, enjoy this product guaranteed.


The Billy Mitchell Court-Martial

On October 28, 1925, a young legal aide reported to a ramshackle warehouse at the foot of the Capitol building in Washington, D.C. He placed a stack of legal volumes on a scarred wooden table, then waited for the court-martial of Army Air Service Colonel William “Billy” Mitchell to begin. William H. Webb was fresh out of law school when chief counsel Frank Reid asked him to join the defense team. Barely mentioned in the hundreds of newspaper accounts of the trial, Webb nonetheless impressed a reporter at the Baltimore Evening Sun, who wrote: “[This] wizard of legal research. cannot be seen as he sits hunched behind a big pillar in the courtroom, and as he seldom even whispers, his presence is unnoticed by spectators and yet, besides Representative Reid, chief counsel, he is probably the most important personage among the Mitchell warriors at the court-martial. He is the pivot of the defense, and it was his nimble fingers that thumbed the thick legal volumes that Reid quotes so glibly.”

From This Story

William Webb was described by the Baltimore Evening Sun as “a studious youngster with a quick wit and a boyish smile.” Webb told the reporter he was proud of two things: “My work on the revision of laws, and. my participation in the Mitchell court-martial.” His scrapbooks are in the National Air and Space Museum’s archives. (NASM (9A06570-P)) Douglas MacArthur The major general and Mitchell were childhood friends. In A Question of Loyalty, a history of the court-martial, Douglas Waller writes that “Mitchell never liked to play with MacArthur when the parents got the two boys together because Mitchell thought MacArthur was a sissy.” (NASM (9A06577-P)) Frank Reid The chief counsel wore the same mouse-colored suit and wine-colored bow tie every day of the trial. “The perenniality of the tie,” reported the Washington Star, “is prejudicial to the good order of a well dressed man.” When encouraged to try a little variety, Reid demurred, saying, “If I put on a new tie, somebody would accuse me of taking a fee.” (NASM (9A06571-P)) William Graves The major general, a member of the court, commanded the Army’s Sixth Corps, headquartered in Chicago. When one of his men testified that the War Department was loath to pay the $1 per year rental for an airfield there, “General Graves’s face was a study,” reported the New York Times. “He lost no time in taking the witness in hand.” (NASM (9A06576-P)) Frank Mccoy Mitchell believed the brigadier general to be his ally on the jury. McCoy was fond of Mitchell and was godparent to one of his children. “Billy Mitchell has stirred up more agitation than anybody since war time,” he wrote to a friend in 1925. After Mitchell’s death in 1936, McCoy honored his comrade one last time as a pallbearer. (NASM (9A06572-P)) Will Rogers The humorist accompanied Mitchell on his last flight as brigadier general before his pre-trial demotion. Mitchell, flying a de Havilland DH-4, offered to point out the sights. Rogers wrote, “I have always heard when you are up on anything high, don’t look down look up. So all I saw was the sky. The trip from a sightseeing point of view was a total loss to me. [Mitchell] asked me if I saw the Mayflower, the President’s private tug. How was I going to see it unless it was flying over us?” (NASM (9A06580-P))

Photo Gallery

Recognizing the significance of the trial, young Webb compiled scrapbooks of material about his experience: photographs, newspaper clippings, and courtroom sketches made by an unidentified artist. There’s Major General Douglas MacArthur, looking impossibly young a frowning Major General William Graves, who fought Communists in Siberia even a drawing of American humorist Will Rogers, who attended the trial to support the defendant. (Mitchell had given Rogers his first airplane ride, and the two had become friends.) William Webb Jr. remembers his father talking about the court-martial for years afterward. “We would look at the scrapbooks and he would give us a general overview of the trial and the people involved in it.” Webb Jr. donated the collection to the National Air and Space Museum in 1992, seven years after his father’s death. “I just thought that would be the place to put it,” he says. “Anybody who had an interest in the trial could come and look at the pictures, the newspaper articles, and so forth.”

How his father came by the sketches is a mystery. Webb Jr. doesn’t know who drew them, but thinks the artist may have been a woman. “My father was trying to capture as much as he could about the trial, and I think he felt the drawings added a little something to the scrapbook itself, so that’s why he put them in,” he says. Sketched by someone in the courtroom as the trial proceeded, the drawings are intimate snapshots of the participants. They have never been published, and have been seen only by those few who have researched the Museum’s Mitchell collection.

The popular Colonel Mitchell was facing a court-martial for his controversial remarks to the press on September 5, blasting two military disasters: a bungled flight during which three Navy seaplanes failed to make it from the West Coast to Hawaii and the crash of the Navy airship USS Shenandoah while flying over the Midwest on an ill-advised public relations tour. “These incidents are the direct result of the incompetency, criminal negligence and almost treasonable administration of the national defense by the Navy and War Departments,” Mitchell stated. “The bodies of my former companions in the air moulder under the soil in America, and Asia, Europe and Africa, many, yes a great many, sent there directly by official stupidity.”

Within days, the War Department charged Mitchell with violating the Ninety-sixth Article of War, which covered “all conduct of a nature to bring discredit upon the military service.”

At the court-martial, Reid—who took the case for free, hoping it would make him a national figure—argued that Mitchell’s Constitutional right to free speech trumped his duties as an officer. Reid praised his client’s warnings as patriotic, concluding with a flourish, “Rome endured as long as there were Romans America will endure as long as there are Mitchells.”

The prosecution, however, argued that in the military, free speech would lead to chaos. Claimed the trial judge advocate: “A private can berate his captain before his company, the captain can criticize and ridicule his major before his battalion and the major can lampoon his colonel…. Discipline and control under such a view of law would vanish and the Army become a mob.”

The trial was front-page news. Each morning, nearly 500 spectators lined up outside the warehouse hoping for one of the few courtroom seats reserved for the public. Society matrons, reported the Los Angeles Times, were dismayed at their reception. “Luxuriously equipped limousines drew up along the curbing. Uniformed footmen jumped to open the doors and assist the occupants to the pavement. The prominent as well as the socially unknown were told in regular doughboy fashion to ‘fall in’ line and await their turn to be admitted.”

Public opinion was for Mitchell, a dashing war hero and unreserved advocate of air power, and stacks of letters poured in. (Mitchell’s wife, Betty, would answer them during courtroom breaks.) Near Thanksgiving a group of Texas cowboys sent a live turkey for the colonel’s holiday dinner and, reported the Washington Herald, offered their services: “If the bunch of us could do any good by standing back of you with Winchesters while you are telling the court about the negligence in the Air Service, we would like to be called as witnesses or guards.”

But the public’s enthusiasm did little good. The defense called 41 witnesses in an attempt to prove that by speaking out, Mitchell hoped to correct the Air Service’s problems. The prosecution, on the other hand, didn’t care if Mitchell’s remarks were truthful or not. They were trying him for insubordination. Because of Mitchell’s high profile and public support, the generals let the defense present its evidence. But their view of Mitchell didn’t change.

In his concluding remarks, Major Allen Gullion, the judge advocate, took a swipe at Mitchell: “Is such a man a safe guide? Is he a constructive person or is he a loose talking imaginative megalomaniac. Is this man a Moses, fitted to lead the people out of a wilderness. Is he not rather the all too familiar charlatan and demagogue type. and except for a decided difference in poise and mental powers in Burr’s favor, like Aaron Burr?”

After more than seven weeks of testimony and 99 witnesses, the court-martial came to a close. In a secret ballot, the court sentenced Mitchell to a suspension from rank, command, and duty, with forfeiture of all pay for five years. “The Court is thus lenient because of the military record of the Accused during the World War,” the generals wrote.


General William Mitchell AP-114 - History

My mother married George Smith, USMC (deceased) in New Zealand in 1944. Up uniil this passage, most war brides from New Zealand and Australia were transported to New Caledonia, but because of problems with child birth, decease and infant death, they stopped sending pregnant women to New Caledonia. Most brides from New Zealand were shipped to New Caledonia on the Luraline. (I do not know if the spelling is correct and under which flag she sailed).

My Grandfather, Percival Thompson, aware that the General William Mitchell was arriving in New Zealand on the way to the United States, contacted a relative who was able to arrange passage for my mother. She arrived in San Pedro on March 3, 1945, the day after her 18th birthday of March 2. I was born March 15, 1945.

She says the ship must have put into Manilla or other Phillipines port because they embarked Filipino officers who were enroute to the United States for additional training.

The General William Mitchell left Melbourne, Australia, proceeding to Auckland New Zealand, embarking war brides on or about Feb 18 or 19, 1945. The Filipino officers had to be relocated to other accomodations on ship as the "staterooms" were given to the women. Pregnant women were given medical assistance and housed in the ship's hospital. My mother said there were about 6 other women in the hospital bay.

The voyage took about 13 days. She recalls a severe storm at sea, and the tremendous noise of the storm and loose items rolling around the ship.

There was a baby born on board the ship on March 2, and she remembers the ship's medical staff laying bets on the baby's size and sex. The mother embarked in Bombay with a final destination of Chicago.

My mother then traveled by troop train to Chicago where she was met by my father and took her to Indianapolis, IN where he was stationed at a logistics supply center. Then on to his parent's home Jeffersonville, IN.


American-Soviet Mural Project - "Clay: a Healing Way"

"Clay: A Healing Way", the American Soviet mural project was conceived by Hartland ceramic artist and teacher, Joel Pfeiffer. During 17 years of backyard and community clay stomps, he noticed that in order to create living clay, people needed to physically support each other while mixing the inter-connectedness and interdependence of people.

What if citizens from the two most powerful countries on earth could come together to mix clay? Could they create a symbol that stood for the belief that nations could also work together and understand their inter-connectedness?

The project's first organizational meeting in March of 1988 started an ever-growing circle of dedicated volunteers. They solved problems such as sponsorship, donations (cash and in-kind), publicity, volunteer recruitment, filming, site location - both for the stomp and installation, insurance, stomp logistics, firing and finishing the mural, interim storage, crating and transporting the completed mural. A similar organization was contacted and organized in Leningrad. Both dealt with the inevitable and sometimes insurmountable red tape of travel arrangements, visas and customs.

On Saturday, June 11, 1989, on the Milwaukee Summerfest Grounds, over 5,000 people and volunteers stomped 15,000 lbs. of clay, creating a mural 8 feet high and 36 feet long. This was then carved, glazed, fired, crated and sent to Leningrad and accompanied by 25 Milwaukee volunteers and three people from the Channels 10/36 film crew.

On Sunday, July 30, 1989 over 2,000 Russians and the Wisconsin volunteers stomped clay together on the banks of the Neva River in front of the historic St. Peter-Paul fortress.

The mural you see here was created that day from the energy and joy of people celebrating together, people who deeply wanted to transcend their differences and declare earth their common home. It was unveiled on November 1, 1989 at the Milwaukee Art Museum to a standing room only crowd. On November 10, the Berlin Wall started to come down.

In August 1990, the Milwaukee mural, Milwaukee's gift to the people of Leningrad, was permanently installed in the lobby of the Port of Leningrad Hotel, the main port authority of Leningrad. Change continued to sweep the Baltics and Eastern Europe.

When even one small pebble hits the water, everything is forever changed. The water level rises and the ripples of energy go out endlessly onto the shores and beyond. It is to this belief - each person's act matters - that this project is dedicated.


Watch the video: Ep51: Haig - Building an Army 1902-14 (October 2022).

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