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Everett- PF-8 - History

Everett- PF-8 - History


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Everett

A city in the State of Washington.

(PF-8: dp. 1,264; 1. 303'11"; b. 37'6"; dr. 13'8";
s. 20 k.; cpl. 190; a. 3 3"; cl. Tacoma)

Everett was launched on 29 September 1943 by Kaiser Cargo Inc., Richmond, Calif., sponsored by Mrs. Cornelia M. Fitch; and commissioned on 22 January 1944, Lieutenant Commander W. L. Davis, USCG, in command.

After shakedown and training, Everett sailed north to Adak, Alaska, arriving 22 April 1944 and began 16 months of arduous patrol and escort duty in the stormy waters of the Aleutian chain. Decommissioned 16 August 1945 at Cold Bay, Alaska, the frigate was transferred to the USSR under lend lease.

Returned to the United States Navy on 15 November 1949, Everett was given an extensive overhaul at Yokosuka, Japan, where she was recommissioned on 26 July 1950. Assigned to primary duty as station ship at Hong Kong, the frigate also joined the United Nations Blockading and Escort Force in operations off both coasts of Korea. On 3 July 1951 while bombarding Wonsan, North Korea, Everett was hit by fire from a shore battery; one man was killed and seven were wounded, but damage to the ship was light.

On 10 March 1953, Everett was decommissioned at Yokosuka and lent to Japan. Following her return to the U.S. Navy she was stricken from the Navy List on 1 December 1961.

Everett received four battle stars for Korean war service.


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Contents

"Snohomish" comes from the name of the largest Native American tribe in the area when settlers arrived in the 19th century. The name is spelled as "Sdoh-doh-hohbsh" in the Lushootseed language and has a disputed meaning with unclear origins, with Indian agent Dr. Charles M. Buchanan once saying that he had "never met an Indian who could give a meaning to the word Snohomish" in his 21 years with the Tulalips. Chief William Shelton, the last hereditary tribal chief of the Snohomish tribe, claimed that it meant "lowland people", a name associated with the tribe's location on the waters of the Puget Sound other scholars have claimed "a style of union among them", "the braves", or "Sleeping Waters". [3] [4]

The name is also used for the Snohomish River, which runs through part of the county, and the City of Snohomish, the former county seat that was renamed after the formation of the county. [4] [5] The current spelling of the name was adopted by the Surveyor General of Washington Territory in 1857, with earlier documents and accounts using alternative spellings. John Work of the Hudson's Bay Company recorded the name "Sinnahmis" in 1824, while the Wilkes Expedition of 1841 used "Tuxpam" to describe the Snohomish River. The same river was named "Sinahomis" by Captain Henry Kellett in 1847, and was accepted by the U.S. government for several years. [4]

Snohomish County was originally inhabited by several Coast Salish groups, predominantly settled along the western coastline and near the region's rivers. The Snohomish were the largest group and occupied an area from present-day Warm Beach to Shoreline, while Stillaguamish lived in the Stillaguamish River basin. [2] The region was first charted and named by European explorers in the late 18th century, beginning with Captain George Vancouver and his British expedition. Vancouver arrived in Puget Sound and Port Gardner Bay on June 4, 1792, landing near present-day Everett. [2]

The Treaty of Point Elliott was signed at present-day Mukilteo on January 22, 1855, marking the cession of Coast Salish territories in the Puget Sound lowlands. The Tulalip Indian Reservation was established to house the remaining tribes, including the Snohomish, Snoqualmie, and Skykomish. Snohomish County was created out of Island County on January 14, 1861. [2]

The territorial legislature designated Mukilteo, the area's largest settlement, as the temporary county seat in January 1861. The county government was permanently moved to Cadyville, later Snohomish, in July of that year. [6] [7] After the incorporation of the city of Everett in 1893, the city's leaders attempted to move the county seat from Snohomish. A countywide general election on November 6, 1894 chose to relocate the county seat to Everett, amid controversy and allegations of illegal votes. After two years of litigation between the cities of Snohomish and Everett, the county seat was officially relocated to Everett in December 1896. [8]

One of the first county censuses was taken in 1862 by Sheriff Salem A. Woods.

Early important pioneers in the Snohomish County region included E. F. Cady of Snohomish, E. C. Ferguson of Snohomish and Isaac Cathcart.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 2,196 square miles (5,690 km 2 ), of which 2,087 square miles (5,410 km 2 ) is land and 109 square miles (280 km 2 ) (5.0%) is water. [9]

Snohomish County is located in western Washington, about halfway between the state's northern and southern borders. Possession Sound and Puget Sound define the county's western border, while the eastern border is defined by the summits of the Cascade Range. Four counties are situated adjacent to Snohomish County: Skagit County to the north, Chelan County to the east, King County to the south, and Island County to the west.

The county's surface is covered by plains in the west and mountainous terrain in the east. The Cascade Range passes through the eastern part of the county and includes the highest point in Snohomish County: Glacier Peak, at 10,541 feet (3,212.90 m) above sea level. Most of the eastern part of the county is preserved by the Mount Baker National Forest and Snoqualmie National Forest, which are consolidated into the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. The mountains provide a source for several major rivers in the east, including the Snohomish, Skykomish, Snoqualmie, and Stillaguamish, that in turn form major bodies of water to the west.

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870599
18801,387 131.6%
18908,514 513.8%
190023,950 181.3%
191059,209 147.2%
192067,690 14.3%
193078,861 16.5%
194088,754 12.5%
1950111,580 25.7%
1960172,199 54.3%
1970265,236 54.0%
1980337,720 27.3%
1990465,642 37.9%
2000606,024 30.1%
2010713,335 17.7%
2020 (est.)830,393 [10] 16.4%
U.S. Decennial Census [11]
1790–1960 [12] 1900–1990 [13]
1990–2000 [14] 2010–2020

2010 census Edit

As of the 2010 census, there were 713,335 people, 268,325 households, and 182,282 families residing in the county. [15] The population density was 341.8 inhabitants per square mile (132.0/km 2 ). There were 286,659 housing units at an average density of 137.3 per square mile (53.0/km 2 ). [16] The racial makeup of the county was 78.4% white, 8.9% Asian, 2.5% black or African American, 1.4% Indigenous, 0.4% Pacific islander, 3.8% from other races, and 4.6% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 9.0% of the population. [15] In terms of ancestry, 20.3% were German, 12.6% were Irish, 12.2% were English, 8.2% were Norwegian, and 3.6% were American. [17]

Of the 268,325 households, 35.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.4% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.1% were non-families, and 24.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.12. The median age was 37.1 years. [15]

The median income for a household in the county was $66,300 and the median income for a family was $77,479. Males had a median income of $56,152 versus $41,621 for females. The per capita income for the county was $30,635. About 5.9% of families and 8.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.8% of those under age 18 and 7.3% of those age 65 or over. [18]

2000 census Edit

As of the 2000 census, there were 606,024 people, 224,852 households, and 157,846 families residing in the county. The population density was 290 people per square mile (112/km 2 ). There were 236,205 housing units at an average density of 113 per square mile (44/km 2 ). The racial makeup of the county was 85.63% White, 1.67% Black or African American, 1.36% Native American, 5.78% Asian, 0.28% Pacific Islander, 1.92% from other races, and 3.36% from two or more races. 4.72% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 16.2% were of German, 10.0% English, 8.8% Irish, 8.4% Norwegian and 6.6% United States or American ancestry. [19]

There were 224,852 households, out of which 37.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.00% were married couples living together, 9.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.80% were non-families. 22.60% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 27.40% under the age of 18, 8.50% from 18 to 24, 33.00% from 25 to 44, 22.00% from 45 to 64, and 9.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $53,060, and the median income for a family was $60,726. Males had a median income of $43,293 versus $31,386 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,417. About 4.90% of families and 6.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.60% of those under age 18 and 7.80% of those age 65 or over.

County Executive Edit

The county executive is Dave Somers, a Democrat. Somers is a former Snohomish County Councilman and took office as county executive on December 23, 2015, having won the seat from incumbent and fellow Democrat John Lovick. [20]

The county executive seat was chartered in the 1979. [21] The first county executive was conservative Democrat [21] Willis Tucker of Snohomish from 1980 to 1991. [21] Following Tucker, the next county executive was Democrat [22] Bob Drewel from 1991 to 2002, [21] [23] followed by Democrat Aaron Reardon from 2003 to 2013. [24] Reardon resigned on May 31, 2013, amid a series of political scandals, and was replaced by former Snohomish County Sheriff and state legislator John Lovick for the remainder of his term. [25] [26]

County Council Edit

The county council is made up of: [27]

    (R) - district 1
  • Megan Dunn (D) - district 2
  • Stephanie Wright (D) - district 3
  • Terry Ryan (D) - district 4 Chair (R) - district 5

Politics Edit

Snohomish County has been a reliably Democratic county in recent presidential elections (albeit to a lesser degree than neighboring King County and Seattle), having not voted for a Republican since George H. W. Bush in 1988.

Presidential election results [28]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 37.9% 166,428 58.5% 256,728 3.6% 15,640
2016 36.2% 128,255 52.2% 185,227 11.6% 41,252
2012 40.1% 133,016 56.8% 188,516 3.1% 10,436
2008 39.3% 126,722 58.1% 187,294 2.5% 8,183
2004 45.5% 134,317 53.0% 156,468 1.6% 4,629
2000 43.6% 109,615 51.6% 129,612 4.8% 12,101
1996 36.9% 81,885 49.5% 109,624 13.6% 30,161
1992 30.7% 69,137 39.3% 88,643 30.0% 67,650
1988 50.3% 84,158 48.3% 80,694 1.4% 2,313
1984 56.8% 90,362 42.0% 66,728 1.2% 1,905
1980 48.7% 66,153 38.3% 52,003 13.1% 17,751
1976 48.0% 55,375 48.2% 55,623 3.9% 4,490
1972 57.3% 60,032 37.7% 39,471 5.1% 5,318
1968 41.5% 36,252 50.4% 44,019 8.2% 7,153
1964 31.8% 25,902 67.6% 55,013 0.6% 490
1960 46.1% 33,731 53.0% 38,793 0.9% 639
1956 48.2% 30,052 51.3% 31,950 0.5% 325
1952 47.9% 26,749 51.1% 28,518 1.0% 534
1948 36.8% 17,018 56.0% 25,924 7.2% 3,318
1944 35.2% 15,182 63.4% 27,345 1.4% 603
1940 33.6% 13,638 64.5% 26,185 1.9% 762
1936 25.0% 8,882 70.5% 25,081 4.5% 1,606
1932 30.1% 9,310 59.3% 18,352 10.7% 3,301
1928 67.4% 16,516 30.3% 7,419 2.3% 572
1924 48.8% 10,484 7.2% 1,548 44.0% 9,441
1920 52.5% 10,793 14.9% 3,056 32.7% 6,718
1916 42.7% 8,625 41.5% 8,390 15.8% 3,192
1912 15.7% 3,007 20.1% 3,846 64.3% 12,329
1908 55.6% 5,659 29.2% 2,974 15.1% 1,538
1904 71.7% 6,025 16.7% 1,405 11.6% 974
1900 51.8% 2,961 43.4% 2,478 4.9% 277
1896 39.2% 1,871 59.9% 2,858 0.9% 45
1892 34.9% 1,488 32.6% 1,390 32.4% 1,382

Snohomish County is one of the most-populous counties in the United States without a four-year, baccalaureate degree-granting institution. [29]

Columbia College offers AA all the way up to a Master's in Business along with other Associate and bachelor's degrees. Everett Community College and Edmonds College provide academic transfer degrees, career training and basic education in Snohomish County. Together, the two serve more than 40,000 people annually. About 40 percent of all high school graduates in Snohomish County begin their college education at Edmonds or Everett community college.

Everett Community College is the legislatively appointed leader of the University Center of North Puget Sound, [30] which offers 25 bachelor's and master's degrees through Western Washington University, Washington State University, Central Washington University, Eastern Washington University, The Evergreen State College, Hope International University, and the University of Washington Bothell.

Edmonds College and Central Washington University have worked together since 1975 to provide higher education in Snohomish County. After earning a two-year degree online or on campus from Edmonds College, students can continue their studies for a bachelor's degree from Central Washington University-Lynnwood in Snoqualmie Hall, a shared building on the Edmonds CC campus.

Residents receive much of their information from Seattle-based media, the most prominent of which include The Seattle Times and regional TV news stations. The Herald in Everett is the county's most popular daily newspaper, while weekly newspapers such as the Snohomish County Tribune, Everett Tribune, Marysville Globe, and The Monroe Monitor serve their respective communities. [31]

The county is part of the Seattle broadcast television market and is served by several regional television news stations, including KOMO, KING, KIRO, KCTS, and KCPQ. [31]

Local radio stations based in the county include KKXA, KRKO, KSER, and KWYZ. [31]

There are also smaller local publications, with significant online presences: The Monroe Monitor, My Edmonds News, Edmonds Beacon, My Everett News, The Mountlake Terrace News, News of Mill Creek, The Mukilteo Beacon, The Snohomish County Reporter, and The Snohomish Times. [31]

Roads Edit

Snohomish County has five major routes that connect the county to the other counties and other areas. There are four north–south routes, which are Interstate 5, Interstate 405, State Route 9, and State Route 99. The only complete east–west route is U.S. Route 2.

Public transportation Edit

Snohomish County is served by three public transit systems: Community Transit, which provides local service within the county (apart from the city of Everett) and commuter service to the Boeing Everett Factory, Downtown Seattle and the University of Washington campus [32] Everett Transit, a municipal system serving the city of Everett [33] and Sound Transit, which provides commuter rail service and express bus service connecting to regional destinations in Seattle and Bellevue. Sound Transit runs four daily Sounder commuter trains at peak hours between Everett Station and Seattle, stopping at Mukilteo and Edmonds. [34] [35]

Intercity rail service is provided by Amtrak, which has two lines operating within Snohomish County: Amtrak Cascades between Seattle and Vancouver, British Columbia, stopping in Edmonds, Everett, and Stanwood station and the Empire Builder between Seattle and Chicago, Illinois, stopping in Edmonds and Everett. [36] Intercity bus service is provided by Greyhound Lines and Northwestern Trailways from Everett Station. [37]

Community Transit also operates a bus rapid transit service called Swift from Everett Station to the Aurora Village in Shoreline along the State Route 99 corridor, which opened in 2009 [38] the service is anticipated to be expanded in 2018, with a new line serving the Airport Road and State Route 527 corridors, from the Boeing Everett Factory to Bothell via Mill Creek. [39] Sound Transit is also planning to extend Link Light Rail service from Northgate to Lynnwood in 2023, having won voter approval for the project in 2008. [40] An additional extension to Everett, not yet approved by voters, has been proposed as part of a regional transit package. [41] Island Transit also operates bus links through Snohomish County from Everett and Skagit County's Mount Vernon to Camano Island because the island does not have direct road access to its county-seat island, Whidbey Island.

Airports Edit

Snohomish County has one major airport: Paine Field, otherwise known as Snohomish County Airport, which has had passenger service since March 2019. [42]

There are three smaller public airports that are open to general aviation: Arlington Municipal Airport in Arlington, Darrington Municipal Airport in Darrington, and Harvey Field in Snohomish. [43] The county also has several private airports, including the Frontier Airpark and Green Valley Airfield in Granite Falls. The Martha Lake Airport in Martha Lake was a former private airport that was closed in 2000 and was converted into a county park that opened in 2010. [44]

Ferries Edit

Snohomish County is also connected to adjacent counties by two ferry routes operated by Washington State Ferries. The Edmonds–Kingston ferry carries SR 104 between Edmonds and Kingston in Kitsap County. The Mukilteo–Clinton ferry carries SR 525 from Mukilteo to Clinton on Whidbey Island. [45]


Service history

World War II, 1944–1945

After shakedown and training, Everett sailed north to Adak, Alaska, arriving there on 22 April 1944, and began 16 months of patrol and escort duty in the Aleutian Islands. She was decommissioned on 16 August 1945 at Cold Bay, Alaska.

Soviet Navy, 1945–1949

Everett was transferred to the Soviet Union under Lend-Lease on 17 August 1945, and returned to the United States Navy on 15 November 1949.

Korean War, 1950–1953

Everett was given an extensive overhaul at Yokosuka, Japan, where she was recommissioned on 26 July 1950. Assigned to primary duty as station ship at Hong Kong, she also joined the United Nations Blockading and Escort Force in operations off both coasts of Korea. On 3 July 1951 while bombarding Wonsan, North Korea, Everett was hit by fire from a shore battery one man was killed and seven were wounded, but damage to the ship was light.

Japanese Navy, 1953–1976

On 10 March 1953, Everett was decommissioned at Yokosuka and was lent to Japan. Struck from the Navy List on 1 December 1961, she was returned to the U.S. on 22 January 1976, and subsequently scrapped.

Everett received four battle stars for Korean war service.


U.S. Navy, World War II, 1944–1945 [ edit | edit source ]

After shakedown and training, Everett steamed north to Adak, Territory of Alaska, arriving there on 22 April 1944, and began 16 months of patrol and escort duty in the Aleutian Islands. Selected for transfer to the Soviet Navy in Project Hula – a secret program for the transfer of U.S. Navy ships to the Soviet Navy at Cold Bay, Alaska, in anticipation of the Soviet Union joining the war against Japan – she then proceeded to Cold Bay in the summer of 1945 and began training her new Soviet crew. Β]

Soviet Navy, 1945–1949 [ edit | edit source ]

Following the completion of training for her Soviet crew, Everett was decommissioned on 16 August 1945 at Cold Bay and transferred to the Soviet Union under Lend-Lease immediately Ώ] along with her sister ships USS Tacoma (PF-3), USS Sausalito (PF-4), USS Hoquiam (PF-5), USS Pasco (PF-6), and USS Albuquerque (PF-7). Commissioned into the Soviet Navy immediately, Α] Everett was designated as a storozhevoi korabl ("escort ship") and renamed EK-15 ΐ] in Soviet service. She soon departed Cold Bay bound for Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky in the Soviet Union, where she served as a patrol vessel in the Soviet Far East. Β]

In February 1946, the United States began negotiations for the return of ships loaned to the Soviet Union for use during World War II. On 8 May 1947, United States Secretary of the Navy James V. Forrestal informed the United States Department of State that the United States Department of the Navy wanted 480 of the 585 combatant ships it had transferred to the Soviet Union for World War II use returned, EK-15 among them. Negotiations for the return of the ships were protracted, but on 15 November 1949 the Soviet Union finally returned EK-15 to the U.S. Navy at Yokosuka, Japan. Γ]

U.S. Navy, Korean War, 1950–1953 [ edit | edit source ]

Reverting to her original name, Everett was given an extensive overhaul at Yokosuka, where she was recommissioned on 26 July 1950 for service during the Korean War. Assigned to primary duty as station ship at Hong Kong, she also joined the United Nations Blockading and Escort Force in operations off both coasts of Korea. On 3 July 1951 while bombarding Wonsan, Everett was hit by fire from a shore battery one man was killed and seven were wounded, but damage to the ship was light.

Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, 1953–1976 [ edit | edit source ]

On 10 March 1953, Everett was decommissioned at Yokosuka and lent to Japan, entering service with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force as JDS Kiri (PF-291). The United States struck her from the Navy List on 1 December 1961. She was reclassified as an "auxiliary stock craft" (YAC) and renamed YAC-20 on 31 March 1970. Decommissioned on 1 October 1975, she was returned to the United States on 22 January 1976 for disposal and subsequently scrapped.


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Everett- PF-8 - History

According to our records North Carolina was his home or enlistment state and Robeson County included within the archival record. We have Fairmont listed as the city. He had enlisted in the United States Navy. Served during the Korean War. Floyd had the rank of Petty Officer Second Class. His military occupation or specialty was Gunner's Mate Second Class. Service number assignment was 8335477. Attached to Frigate USS EVERETT PF-8. During his service in the Korean War, Navy Petty Officer Second Class Floyd experienced a traumatic event which ultimately resulted in loss of life on July 5, 1951 . Recorded circumstances attributed to: Died of Wounds. Incident location: North Korea. Gunner's Mate Second Class (Missiles) Floyd served aboard the frigate USS EVERETT (PF-8). On July 3, 1951, his ship was hit by an enemy shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea causing 8 casualties. He died of those wounds on July 5, 1951. Gunner's Mate Second Class (Missiles) Floyd was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal. Lawrence is remembered at the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington. This is a National Parks Service and American Battle Monuments Commission location.
    damaged by North Korean coastal artillery during the landing at Inchon 7 hits with 5 wounded, 13 September 1950 minor damage from coastal artillery during the landing at Inchon 3 hits, no casualties, 13 September 1950 2 near misses by coastal artillery during the landing at Inchon 1 killed and 1 wounded, 13 September 1950. damaged after striking a mine at off the coast of Tanchon, North Korea 9 killed and 10 wounded, 26 September 1950. damaged after striking a mine 5 missing and 48 wounded, 30 September 1950. damaged by 3 hits from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea, 23 December 1950. damaged after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 2 casualties, 23 December 1950. extensively damaged after striking a mine off the east coast of North Korea, 26 killed. Ώ] 12 June 1951. extensively damaged after being hit by a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea, 3 killed and 4 wounded, 14 June 1951. On 20 August 1052 Chinese battery hit the flying bridge killing 4 and wounding 9. slightly damaged after being hit by a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea, 1 casualty, 7 May 1951. slightly damaged after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 4 casualties, 20 May 1951. minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 8 casualties, 22 May 1951. slightly damaged after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 4 casualties, 18 June 1951. superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 28 June 1951. minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 8 casualties, 3 July 1951 . minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 2 casualties, 31 July 1951 . superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 1 killed and 3 wounded, 11 August 1951. fireroom flooded after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, no casualties, 8 September 1951. superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, no casualties, 10 September 1951. minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, no casualties, 10 September 1951. slight damage after being hit by a shore battery at Hungnam, North Korea, no casualties, 5 October 1951. extensive damage after striking a mine off the East coast of North Korea, 27 casualties, 7 October 1951. slight damage after being hit by a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea, 1 casualty, 11 October 1951. moderate damage after being hit by a shore battery at Hungnam, North Korea, 3 casualties, 17 October 1951. - slight damage after being hit by a shore battery at Hungnam, North Korea, 4 casualties, 23 October 1951. considerable damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 1 casualty, 29 October 1951. light damage after being hit by a shore battery at Hongwon, North Korea, 12 casualties, 11 November 1951. minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, no casualties, 23 November 1951. superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery, no casualties, 22 December 1951. minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 3 casualties, 11 January 1952. minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Sokto, North Korea, no casualties, 3 February 1952. minor damage after 2 hits from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea, no casualties, 4 February 1952. minor damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Hungnam, North Korea, no casualties, 22 February 1952. moderate damage after 3 hits from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea, 15 casualties, 22 February 1952. minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Hungnam, North Korea, no casualties, 23 February 1952. insignificant damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea, 3 casualties, 16 March 1952. moderate damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 5 casualties, 24 March 1952. insignificant damage after being hit by a shore battery at Chongjin, North Korea, no casualties, 7 April 1952. minor damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea, no casualties, 19 April 1952. minor damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea, no casualties, 24 April 1952. minor damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 2 casualties, 26 April 1952. superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, no casualties, 30 April 1952. superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, no casualties, 30 April 1952. superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, no casualties, 2 May 1952. considerable damage after 6 hits from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea, 10 casualties, 7 May 1952. superficial damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, no casualties, 12 May 1952. minor damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Hungnam, North Korea, 2 casualties, 14 May 1952. superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 2 casualties, 25 May 1952. slight damage after 3 hits from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea, no casualties, 25 May 1952. slight damage after being hit by a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea, no casualties, 26 May 1952. minor damage after hits from machine gun mounts. No casualties, 30 May 1952. motor launch damaged after being hit by a shore battery at Kojo, North Korea, 2 casualties, 13 June 1952. minor damage 1 hit after receiving 50 rounds of 75 mm from North Korean shore batteries 4 casualties, 13 June 1952. minor damage after 4 hits from North Korean shore batteries 8 casualties, 14 July 1952 moderate damage after 7 hits from a North Korean shore battery at Tanchon, North Korea, 10 casualties, 6 August 1952. minor damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 2 casualties, 10 August 1952. minor damage after 1 hit below the waterline from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, no casualties, 12 August 1952. minor damage in the vicinity of the bridge after an air burst and near misses from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea, 13 casualties, 20 August 1952. superficial damage and lost sweep gear after a shrapnel near miss from a shore battery at Pkg. 4-5, no casualties, 27 August 1952. superficial damage after receiving 60 rounds at 3,700 yards while at Pkg 4-5, no casualties, 27 August 1952. superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at the Kangsong, North Korea area bombline, 1 casualty, 1 September 1952. slight damage from near misses, after receiving 69 rounds, from a shore battery at Tanchon, North Korea, no casualties, 8 September 1952. major damage after striking a mine 90 miles east of Wonsan, North Korea, 11 casualties, 16 September 1952. moderate damage from 5 hits and 7 air bursts from North Korean shore batteries. Received 150 rounds of 105 mm from 3 guns. First round was a direct hit at an initial range of 3,500 yards. 8 casualties, 19 September 1952. superficial damage after being straddled by 5 rounds, from a shore battery at range of 5,000 yards, at Kojo, North Korea. The ship was sprayed with shrapnel from 2 near misses, 18 casualties, 13 October 1952. minor damage after being hit by a shore battery at Kojo, North Korea, 4 casualties, 14 October 1952. moderate damage from 2 hits after receiving 50 rounds from 4-6 guns at Wonsan, North Korea, 8 casualties, 21 October 1952. minor shrapnel damage after receiving 40 rounds from 4 shore battery guns. The suspected radar controlled guns straddled the ship at a range of 4,300-8,000 yards. No casualties, 28 October 1952. minor damage from 3 hits after receiving 160 rounds from a shore battery, 13 casualties, 3 November 1952. 1 small boat destroyed by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 5 casualties, 19 November 1952. minor damage from 1 hit after receiving 89 rounds from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 1 casualty, 20 November 1952. moderate damage from 1 hit after receiving 60 rounds from a shore battery at Songjin, North Korea, 1 casualty, 24 November 1952. whaleboat damaged after being hit by a shore battery at Hwa-do, North Korea, 2 casualties, 6 February 1953. minor damage from 1 hit after receiving 60 rounds at a range of 5,400-10,000 yards from a North Korean shore battery while at Pkg 2, 2 casualties, 16 March 1953. slight damage from 1 hit after receiving 45 rounds from a shore battery at a range of 6,400-10,000 yards, 1 casualty, 17 March 1953. slight damage from 1 hit after receiving 40 rounds of 105 mm from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, no casualties, 27 March 1953. minor damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 13 casualties, 2 April 1953. slight damage from 1–76 mm hit after receiving 209 rounds of heavy fire from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 3 casualties, 16 April 1953. slight damage from 1 hit after receiving 60 rounds of 155 mm at a range of 8,000-12,000 yards from a shore battery near Wonsan, North Korea, 9 casualties, 19 April 1953. moderate damage from 1 hit from a shore battery at Hodo Pando, North Korea. The ship received 186 rounds of 105 mm and several near misses from 4 guns. No casualties, 2 May 1953. minor damage from 1 hit from a shore battery at Hodo Pando, North Korea. The ship received 100 rounds of 105 mm with 1 near miss and several straddles from 4 guns. No casualties, 2 May 1953. superficial damage after 1 near miss from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea. The ship received 18 rounds of 76 mm - 135 mm, 2 casualties, 5 May 1953. superficial damage from 1 hit from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea. The ship received 60 rounds of 90 mm, no casualties, 8 May 1953. minor damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea. The ship received 20 rounds of 76 mm, 9 casualties, 15 May 1953. superficial damage from 1 hit from a shore battery at Yang-do, North Korea. The ship received 30 rounds of 76 mm, 1 casualty, 29 May 1953. minor damage after 2 hits from a shore battery at Walsa-ri, North Korea. The ship received 30 rounds of 76 mm, 5 casualties, 4 June 1953. superficial damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea. The ship received 35 rounds of 76 mm with several air bursts, no casualties, 11 June 1953. superficial damage after being hit by a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 17 June 1953. minor damage from 1 hit after receiving 90 rounds near Wonsan, North Korea, 5 casualties, 18 June 1953. moderate damage from 5 hits after receiving 45 rounds of 76–155 mm, at 7,500 yards, near Wonsan, North Korea, 9 casualties, 18 June 1953. slight damage from 2 hits and shrapnel from 5 near misses after receiving 150 rounds of 76–90 mm, at 6,000 to 11,000 yards from a North Korean shore battery, near Songjin, North Korea, 3 casualties, 25 June 1953. superficial damage after near misses during a 30-minute gun duel with a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, no casualties, 30 June 1953. minor shrapnel damage after near misses from 150 rounds of 107 mm from a shore battery at Hodo Pando, North Korea, 7 July 1953. minor damage after 80 rounds of 76 mm air bursts close aboard from a shore battery at Pkg 2, 5 casualties, 8 July 1953. Damaged on 17 November 1950, 6 wounded on Chongjin, on 21 April 1952 and accident during attacks against the ports of Wonsan and Chongjin letf 30 killed ΐ] severe underwater damage after one 76–90 mm hit from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, no casualties, 11 July 1953.

This page is based on the public domain list at the US Department of the Navy web site [1].


Everett Pianos Built by Yamaha

The Meridian Corporation owned the company in 1973, when it was sold to Yamaha Int'l. Everett vertical pianos were built by Yamaha, along with its United States made pianos, until Yamaha closed the South Haven factory in September 1986, moving to Thomaston, GA.

An Everett grand piano was also produced in Japan for a short time.

In 1986, Yamaha stopped production of the Everett piano, and the name ceased to be used by Yamaha in 1989. During this period, from 1986-1989, Everett pianos were manufactured to Yamaha specifications by the Baldwin Piano Company.

Everett pianos are known for their innovative qualities. Although Everett pianos have ceased production since 1989, the legacy of this great name remains stamped in the minds of piano enthusiasts and music aficionados.

Everett Piano Serial Numbers

Locate your piano’s age and serial number using the chart below.

1883 - 100
1890 - 17000
1900 - 31000
1910 - 39600
1920 - 43900
1930 - 46600
1940 - 50400
1950 - 71000
1955 - 98000
1960 - 125700
1965 - 168000
1970 - 195000
1975 - 229000
1980 - 269000
1985 - 296000
1989 - 351000


You've only scratched the surface of Everett family history.

Between 1943 and 2004, in the United States, Everett life expectancy was at its lowest point in 1943, and highest in 1998. The average life expectancy for Everett in 1943 was 27, and 72 in 2004.

An unusually short lifespan might indicate that your Everett ancestors lived in harsh conditions. A short lifespan might also indicate health problems that were once prevalent in your family. The SSDI is a searchable database of more than 70 million names. You can find birthdates, death dates, addresses and more.


Watch the video: Union 12pm Experience (November 2022).

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