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Singapore English and Singlish
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Singapore English and Singlish

Singapore English is a dialect of the English language that is used in the Republic of Singapore, a lingua franca influenced by Chinese and Malay. Also called Singaporean English . Educated speakers of Singapore English generally distinguish this variety of the language from Singlish (also known as Singapore Colloquial English ).

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Middle School Debate Topics

Debates are a wonderful, high-interest way to teach a number of skills to students. They provide students with the ability to research a topic, work as a team, practice public speaking, and use critical thinking skills. Despite-or perhaps because of-the challenges that go along with teaching tweens, holding debates in middle school classes can be especially rewarding.
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Molarity Definition in Chemistry

In chemistry, molarity is a concentration unit, defined to be the number of moles of solute divided by the number of liters of solution. Units of Molarity Molarity is expressed in units of moles per liter (mol/L). It's such a common unit, it has its own symbol, which is a capital letter M. A solution that has the concentration 5 mol/L would be called a 5 M solution or said to have a concentration value of 5 molar.
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Summary and Review of Proof by David Auburn

"Proof" by David Auburn premiered on Broadway in October 2000. It received national attention, earning the Drama Desk Award, the Pulitzer Prize, and the Tony Award for Best Play. The play is an intriguing story about family, truth, gender, and mental health, set in the context of academic mathematics.
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The History of Port Royal, Jamaica

Port Royal is a town on the southern coast of Jamaica. It was initially colonized by the Spanish but was attacked and captured by the English in 1655. Because of its excellent natural harbor and critical position, Port Royal quickly became a significant haven for pirates and buccaneers, who were made welcome because of the need for defenders.
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Biography of Edward Low, English Pirate

Edward "Ned" Low (1690-1724) was an English criminal, sailor, and pirate. He took up piracy sometime around 1722, after the execution of Charles Vane. Low was very successful, plundering dozens if not hundreds of ships over the course of his criminal career. Like Vane, Low was known for his cruelty to his prisoners and was greatly feared on both sides of the Atlantic.
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'To Kill a Mockingbird' Themes, Symbols, and Literary Devices

To Kill a Mockingbird seems like a very simple, well-written morality tale at first glance. But if you take a closer look, you'll find a much more complex story. Your first hint is the sleight of hand author Harper Lee employs in the point of view: the narrator, Jenna Louise Finch, is an adult recounting her adventures as a child.
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A Brief History of Japan's Daimyo Lords

A daimyo was a feudal lord in shogunal Japan from the 12th century to the 19th century. The daimyos were large landowners and vassals of the shogun. Each daimyo hired an army of samurai warriors to protect his family's lives and property. The word "daimyo" comes from the Japanese roots " dai ," meaning "big or great," and " myo," or "name.
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Biography of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, 16th Century Unifier of Japan

Toyotomi Hideyoshi (1539-September 18, 1598) was the leader of Japan who reunified the country after 120 years of political fragmentation. During his rule, known as the Momoyama or Peach Mountain age, the country was united as a more-or-less peaceful federation of 200 independent daimyo (great lords), with himself as an imperial regent.
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Where Do Polar Bears Live?

Polar bears are the largest bear species. They can grow to from 8 feet to 11 feet tall and about 8 feet long, and they can weigh in anywhere from 500 pounds to 1,700 pounds. They are easy to recognize due to their white coat and dark eyes and nose. You may have seen polar bears in zoos, but do you know where these iconic marine mammals live in the wild?
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The Palace of Palenque - Royal Residence of Pakal the Great

One of the finest examples of Maya architecture is without a doubt the Royal Palace of Palenque, the Classic Maya (250-800 CE) site in the state of Chiapas, Mexico. Fast Facts: Palenque Known For: The palace of the Maya king Pakal the Great Culture/Country: Maya / UNESCO World Heritage Site in Palenque, Chiapas, Mexico Occupation Date: Classic Maya (250-800 CE) Features: Palace buildings, courtyards, sweat baths, Pakal's throne room, reliefs, and painted stucco murals.
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Biography of Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria

Franz Ferdinand (December 18, 1863-June 28, 1914) was a member of the royal Habsburg dynasty, which ruled the Austro-Hungarian Empire. After his father died in 1896, Ferdinand became next in line for the throne. His assassination in 1914 at the hands of a Bosnian revolutionary led to the outbreak of World War I.
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Biography of Sybil Ludington, Possible Female Paul Revere

Sybil Ludington (April 5, 1761-February 26, 1839) was a young woman who lived in rural Dutchess County, New York, close to the Connecticut border, during the American Revolution. The daughter of a commander in the Dutchess County militia, 16-year-old Sybil is said to have ridden 40 miles into what is today Connecticut to warn members of her father's militia that the British were about to attack their neighborhood.
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The 10 Stages of a Criminal Case

If you have been arrested for a crime, you are at the beginning of what could become a long journey through the criminal justice system. Although the process may vary somewhat from state to state, these are the steps that most criminal cases follow until their case is resolved. Some cases end quickly with a guilty plea and paying a fine, while others can go on for decades through the appeals process.
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How Women Abolitionists Fought Slavery

"Abolitionist" was the word used in the 19th century for those who worked to abolish the institution of slavery. Women were quite active in the abolitionist movement, at a time when women were, in general, not active in the public sphere. The presence of women in the abolitionist movement was considered by many to be scandalous-not just because of the issue itself, which was not universally supported even in states that had abolished slavery within their borders, but because these activists were women, and the dominant expectation of the "proper" place for women was in the domestic, not the public, sphere.
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Understanding the Definition of Plankton

Plankton is a general term for the "floaters," the organisms in the ocean that drift with the currents. This includes zooplankton (animal plankton), phytoplankton (plankton that is capable of photosynthesis), and bacterioplankton (bacteria). Origin of the Word Plankton The word plankton comes from the Greek word planktos , which means "wanderer" or "drifter.
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Thomas Edison

Thomas Edison was one of history's most influential inventors, whose contributions to the modern era transformed the lives of people the world over. Edison is best known for having invented the electric light bulb, the phonograph, and the first motion-picture camera, and held an astonishing 1,093 patents in total.
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Biography of John Brown

The abolitionist John Brown remains one of the most controversial figures of the 19th century. During a few years of fame before his fateful raid on the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Americans either regarded him as a noble hero or a dangerous fanatic. After his execution on December 2, 1859, Brown became a martyr to those opposed to slavery.
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Margaret Beaufort, King's Mother

Continued from: Henry VII Becomes King and Margaret Beaufort the King's Mother Margaret Beaufort's long efforts to promote her son's succession were richly rewarded, emotionally and materially. Henry VII, having defeated Richard III and become king, had himself crowned on October 30, 1485. His mother, now 42 years old, reportedly wept at the coronation.
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What Is a Dean of Students?

Nearly every college campus has a dean of students (or something similar). It's common knowledge that they're in charge of all things that relate to students, but if you were asked to define that in more detail, you'd probably draw a blank. So, just what is a dean of students, and how should you utilize the dean of students office during your time in school?
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Creating a Spinning Steel Wool Sparkler

Steel wool, like all metals, burns when enough energy is supplied. It's a simple oxidation reaction, like rust formation, except faster. This is the basis for the thermite reaction, but it's even easier to burn a metal when it has a lot of surface area. Here's a fun fire science project where you spin burning steel wool to create a fantastic sparkler effect.
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