Category Info

Do Statues of Riders or Knights Conceal Codes?
Info

Do Statues of Riders or Knights Conceal Codes?

There are statues all over the place, all over the world, but a set of myths have developed regarding some statues in Europe. In particular, statues of people on horseback and statues of medieval knights and monarchs are often spread about. The Myths On a statue of a horse and rider, the number of legs in the air reveals information about how the rider died: both legs in the air means they died during a battle, one leg in the air means they died later of wounds inflicted during a battle.

Read More

Info

Push-Pull Factors in Immigration

In geographical terms, the push-pull factors are those that drive people away from a place and draw people to a new location. A combination of push-pull factors helps determine migration or immigration of particular populations from one land to another. Push factors are often forceful, demanding that a certain person or group of people leave one country for another, or at least giving that person or people strong reasons to want to move-either because of a threat of violence or the loss of financial security.
Read More
Info

Virginia Military Institute (VMI) Admissions

The Virginia Military Institute is a selective school that accepts roughly half of applicants each year. See what makes it unique and what it takes to attend this college. About VMI Established in 1839, the Virginia Military Institute is the oldest public military college in the United States and one of the country's six Senior Military Colleges (with The Citadel, NGCSU, Norwich University, Texas A&M, and Virginia Tech).
Read More
Info

Henry Bessemer - The Steel Man

Sir Henry Bessemer, an Englishman, invented the first process for mass-producing steel inexpensively in the 19th century. It was an essential contribution to the development of modern day skyscrapers. The First System for Manufacturing Steel An American, William Kelly, initially held a patent for "a system of air blowing the carbon out of pig iron," a method of steel production known as the pneumatic process.
Read More
Info

Biography of Andrew Carnegie, Steel Magnate

Andrew Carnegie (November 25, 1835-August 11, 1919) was a steel magnate, leading industrialist, and philanthropist. With a keen focus on cost-cutting and organization, Carnegie was often regarded as a ruthless robber baron, though he eventually withdrew from business to devote himself to donating money to various philanthropic causes.
Read More
Info

Biography of Tamerlane, 14th Century Conqueror of Asia

Tamerlane (April 8, 1336-February 18, 1405) was the ferocious and terrifying founder of the Timurid empire of Central Asia, eventually ruling much of Europe and Asia. Throughout history, few names have inspired such terror as his. Tamerlane was not the conqueror's actual name, though. More properly, he is known as Timur , from the Turkic word for "iron.
Read More
Info

What Is a Teaching Assistant?

Teaching assistants are referred to in different ways-teacher aides, instructional aides, and paraprofessionals-depending on the area of the country and the school district where they work. Teaching assistants fulfill a key support role in helping students succeed in the classroom environment. Their responsibilities are many and varied.
Read More
Info

What You Should Know About Kwanzaa and Why It's Celebrated

Unlike Christmas, Ramadan, or Hanukkah, Kwanzaa is unaffiliated with a major religion. One of the newer American holidays, Kwanzaa originated in the turbulent 1960s to instill racial pride and unity in the black community. Now, fully recognized in mainstream America, Kwanzaa is widely celebrated. The U.
Read More
Info

Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers

Over 10 million digitized historic American newspaper pages are available for online research through Chronicling America , a free website of the U.S. Library of Congress. But while the simple search box can return a lot of interesting results, learning how to make good use of the site's advanced search and browse features will uncover articles you've might otherwise have missed.
Read More
Info

What Are Acids and Bases?

There are several methods of defining acids and bases. While these definitions don't contradict each other, they do vary in how inclusive they are. The most common definitions of acids and bases are Arrhenius acids and bases, Brønsted-Lowry acids and bases, and Lewis acids and bases. Antoine Lavoisier, Humphry Davy, and Justus Liebig also made observations regarding acids and bases, but didn't formalize definitions.
Read More
Info

How to Use 'It Depends' in Conversation

In conversation, it is not always possible to give a yes or no answer to a question about our opinion. Life is not always black or white! For example, imagine you are having a conversation about your study habits. Someone might ask you: "Do you study hard?" You might want to say: "Yes, I study hard." However, that statement might not be 100% true.
Read More
Info

What is Social Class, and Why Does it Matter?

Class, economic class, socio-economic class, social class. What's the difference? Each refers to how people are sorted into groups-specifically ranked hierarchies-in society. There are, in fact, important differences among them. Economic Class Economic class refers specifically to how one ranks relative to others in terms of income and wealth.
Read More
Info

'On National Prejudices' by Oliver Goldsmith

Irish poet, essayist, and dramatist Oliver Goldsmith is best known for the comic play "She Stoops to Conquer," the long poem "The Deserted Village," and the novel "The Vicar of Wakefield." In his essay "On National Prejudices" (first published in the British Magazine in August 1760), Goldsmith argues that it is possible to love one's own country "without hating the natives of other countries.
Read More
Info

Bonnethead Shark (Sphyrna tiburo)

The bonnethead shark ( Sphyrna tiburo ), also known as the bonnet shark, bonnet nose shark, and shovelhead shark is one of nine species of hammerhead sharks. These sharks all have a unique hammer or shovel-shaped heads. The bonnethead has a shovel-shaped head with a smooth edge. The head shape of the bonnethead may help it more easily find prey.
Read More
Info

History of the Yellow Star Inscribed With 'Jude'

The yellow star, inscribed with the word "Jude" ("Jew" in German), has become a symbol of Nazi persecution. Its likeness abounds upon Holocaust literature and materials. But the Jewish badge was not instituted in 1933 when Hitler came to power. It was not instituted in 1935 when the Nuremberg Laws stripped Jews of their citizenship.
Read More
Info

What Is Dry Ice?

Dry ice is the general term for solid carbon dioxide (CO), coined in 1925 by Long Island-based Prest Air Devices. Though originally a trademarked term, "dry ice" has become the most common way of referring to carbon dioxide in its solid, or frozen, state. How Is Dry Ice Manufactured? Carbon dioxide is "frozen" by compressing carbon dioxide gas to a high pressure to create dry ice.
Read More
Info

Happy Valentine's Day Quotes for Your Love

There is no such thing as a perfect occasion to say "I love you." The right moment is now. If your dearest is away at work, surprise him or her with a text message on Valentine's Day. Or meet your sweetie for a quick lunch with some awesome chocolate cupcakes for dessert. Send two dozen roses to the office with a beautiful note attached.
Read More
Info

The Currency Act of 1764

The Currency Act of 1764 was the second and most impactful of two laws passed by the British government during the reign of King George III that attempted to take total control of the monetary systems of all 13 colonies of British America. Passed by Parliament on September 1, 1764, the act extended the restrictions of the Currency Act of 1751 to all 13 of the American British colonies.
Read More
Info

Understanding and Using French Gestures

If you've ever been to France or watched French movies, you've undoubtedly seen French people performing some familiar gestures as well as a few unfamiliar ones. While some gestures are vulgar, others are as innocuous as shaking or nodding one's head. In any case, it is as essential to understand this French "sign language" as it is any vocabulary.
Read More
Info

How to Find the Main Idea

Questions about the "main idea" of a passage are popular on reading comprehension tests, but sometimes, those questions are pretty difficult to answer, especially for students who are not completely sure they understand what the main idea really is. Finding the main idea of a paragraph or longer passage of text is one of the most important reading skills to master, along with concepts like making an inference, finding the author's purpose, or understanding vocabulary words in context.
Read More
Info

Isoelectronic Definition

Isoelectronic refers to two atoms, ions, or molecules that have the same electronic structure and the same number of valence electrons. The term means "equal electric" or "equal charge". Isoelectronic chemical species typically display similar chemical properties. Atoms or ions with the same electronic configurations are said to be isoelectronic to each other or to have the same isoelectronicity.
Read More
Video, Sitemap-Video, Sitemap-Videos