Category Interesting

Who Invented the Electoral College?
Interesting

Who Invented the Electoral College?

Who invented the electoral college? The short answer is the founding fathers (aka the framers of the Constitution.) But if credit is to be given to one person, it's often attributed to James Wilson of Pennsylvania, who proposed the idea prior to the committee of eleven making the recommendation. However, the framework they put into place for the election of the nation's president is not only oddly undemocratic, but also opens the door to some quirky scenarios, such as a candidate who wins presidency without having captured the most votes.

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Cumberland Gap

The Cumberland Gap is a V-shaped passage through the Appalachian Mountains at the intersection of Kentucky, Virginia, and Tennessee. Aided by continental shifts, a meteorite impact, and flowing water, the Cumberland Gap region has become a visual marvel and a timeless asset to human and animal migration.
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Je Vais-Don't Make This Mistake in French

In English, you can say "I'm going," and everyone will understand that you're either leaving your current location or are on your way to a new destination that was previously mentioned. In French, however, simply saying Je vais (I'm going) is incomplete. You will need to add to it an adverbial pronoun to make it correct.
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The History of Singapore's Economic Development

In the 1960s, the city-state of Singapore was an undeveloped country with a GDP per capita of less than U.S. $320. Today, it is one of the world's fastest-growing economies. Its GDP per capita has risen to an incredible U.S. $60,000, making it one of the strongest economies in the world. For a small country with few natural resources, Singapore's economic ascension is nothing short of remarkable.
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How to Use Jamais in French

Many people who learn French know that it's a language of tricky spellings. Jamais is one of those words. It sometimes poses problems to the language learners because you can easily confuse it with j'aimais, which means something completely different. J'aimais, spelled with the added apostrophe and "i," means "I loved," or "I was loving/liking/enjoying" and comes from the verb aimer .
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Review of Kafka's "Metamorphosis"

In The Metamorphosis , German novelist Franz Kafka warns that capitalism harbors inevitable changes that will result ultimately in loneliness and horror. He does so with a prophecy that women will replace men in the 20th-century workforce, to their detriment. Introducing Gregor In Part I of this novella, Gregor Samsa is a harried traveling salesman that runs back and forth, hawking fabric to support his parents and sister, Grete.
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South Korea Computer Gaming Culture

South Korea is a country infatuated with video games. It is a place where professional gamers earn six-figure contracts, date supermodels, and are treated as A-list celebrities. Cyber competitions are nationally televised and they fill-up stadiums. In this country, gaming is not just a hobby; it's a way of life.
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Australia's Massive Feral Rabbit Problem

Rabbits are an invasive species that has caused immense ecological devastation to the continent of Australia for over 150 years. They procreate with uncontrollable velocity, consume cropland like locusts, and contribute significantly to soil erosion. Although some of the government's rabbit eradication methods have been successful in controlling their spread, the overall rabbit population in Australia is still well beyond sustainable means.
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African-American History Timeline: 1960 to 1964

1960 Four students from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College orchestrate a sit-in at a Woolworth Drug Store, protesting its policy of not allowing African-Americans from sitting at lunch counters. Musician Chubby Checker records “The Twist.” The song prompts an international dance craze.
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What Is and Is Not a Chemical?

Chemicals occur naturally and can be made artificially. Definition Of Chemical A chemical is any substance consisting of matter. This includes any liquid, solid, or gas. A chemical is any pure substance (an element) or any mixture (a solution, compound, or gas). Examples of Naturally-Occurring Chemicals Naturally-occurring chemicals can be solid, liquid, or gas.
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Comparing the City in the United States and Canada

Canadian and American cities may appear remarkably similar. They both display great ethnic diversity, impressive transportation infrastructure, high socioeconomic status, and sprawl. However, when the generalizations of these traits are broken down, it reveals a multitude of urban contrasts. Sprawl in the United States and Canada In contrast, even when controlling for population data from annexed territory, six of the ten largest Canadian cities saw a population explosion from 1971-2001 (the Canadian census was conducted one year after U.
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The United Kingdom's Ageing Population

Like many countries across Europe, the United Kingdom's population is ageing. Although the number of elderly people is not rising as quickly as some countries such as Italy or Japan, the UK's 2001 census showed that for the first time, there were more people aged 65 and older than under 16 living in the country.
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Three Gorges Dam on Yangtze River in China

China's Three Gorges Dam is the world's largest hydroelectric dam based on generating capacity. It is 1.3 miles wide, over 600 feet in height, and has a reservoir that stretches 405 square miles. The reservoir helps control flooding on the Yangtze River basin and allows 10,000-ton ocean freighters to sail into the interior of China six months out of the year.
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The Pastry War

The “Pastry War” was fought between France and Mexico from November 1838 to March 1839. The war was nominally fought because French citizens living in Mexico during a prolonged period of strife had their investments ruined and the Mexican government refused any sort of reparations, but it also had to do with long-standing Mexican debt.
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China's Hukou System

China's Hukou system is a family registration program that serves as a domestic passport, regulating population distribution and rural-to-urban migration. It is a tool for social and geographic control that enforces an apartheid structure that denies farmers the same rights and benefits enjoyed by urban residents.
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The Scopes Trial

The Scopes "Monkey" Trial (official name is State of Tennessee v John Thomas Scopes ) began on July 10, 1925, in Dayton, Tennessee. On trial was science teacher John T. Scopes, charged with violating the Butler Act, which prohibited the teaching of evolution in Tennessee public schools. Known in its day as "the trial of the century," the Scopes Trial pitted two famous lawyers against one another: Beloved orator and three-time presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan for the prosecution and renowned trial attorney Clarence Darrow for the defense.
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Tourism in Antarctica

Antarctica has become one of the world's most popular tourist destinations. Since 1969, the average number of visitors to the continent has increased from several hundred to over 34,000 today. All activities in Antarctica are heavily regulated by the Antarctic Treaty for environmental protection purposes and the industry is largely managed by the International Association of Antarctica Tour Operators (IAATO).
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The Geography of Detroit's Decline

During the mid-20th century, Detroit was the fourth largest city in the United States with a population of over 1.85 million people. It was a thriving metropolis that embodied the American Dream - a land of opportunity and growth. Today, Detroit has become a symbol of urban decay. Detroit's infrastructure is crumbling and the city is operating at $300 million dollars short of municipal sustainability.
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Did the Romans Believe Their Myths?

The Romans crossed the Greek gods and goddesses with their own pantheon. They absorbed the local gods and goddesses when they incorporated foreign peoples into their empire and related the indigenous gods to pre-existing Roman deities. How could they possibly believe in such a confusing welter? Many have written about this, some saying that to ask such questions results in anachronism.
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When Did the Great Recession End?

The recession that began in the late 2000s was, to date, the worst economic downturn in the United States since the Great Depression. They didn't call it the "Great Recession" for nothing. So how long did the recession last? When did it begin? When did it end? How did the length of the recession compare to previous recessions?
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Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela was elected the first black president of South Africa in 1994, following the first multiracial election in South Africa's history. Mandela was imprisoned from 1962 to 1990 for his role in fighting apartheid policies established by the ruling white minority. Revered by his people as a national symbol of the struggle for equality, Mandela is considered one of the 20th century's most influential political figures.
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