Category Life

Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel
Life

Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel

Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel was a powerful member of the mafia in the early to mid 1900s. He was handsome, had a quick temper and a ruthless personality. Siegel was killed in June of 1947 when an unknown assailant shot him while he was visiting his girlfriend, Virginia Hill. Siegel's Early Life Benjamin Siegel was born on February 28, 1906 in Brooklyn, New York.

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Life

Use Verbs and Adjectives to Brighten up Your News Stories

Journalism students just getting started in the craft of news writing tend to clog up their prose with too many adjectives and lots of boring, cliched verbs, when in fact, they should be doing the opposite. A key to good writing is to use adjectives sparingly while choosing interesting, unusual verbs that readers don't expect.
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Life

Recommended Reads for High School Freshmen

These are a sampling of the titles that often appear on high-school reading lists for 9th grade, as they encourage independent reading and are written at a level appropriate for a high school freshman. Literature programs vary by high school, but the books on this list are important introductions to literature.
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Life

How to Use the USPS Hold Mail Service

You spent months planning the perfect vacation. The bags are packed, the car is loaded, and the dog is in the kennel. But what about having days of mail stacking up in your mailbox where robbers and identity thieves might get their hands on it? No problem. Go online and have the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) hold your mail while you're gone.
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Life

Fake Facts About Explorers Help Teach Research Skills

If you Google the explorer Ferdinand Magellan, one of the top results you'll get is a web page from the website All About Explorers that states: "In 1519, at the age of only 27, he was supported by several wealthy businessmen, including Marco Polo, Bill Gates, and Sam Walton, to finance an expedition to the Spice Islands.
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Life

What Classes Will You Take in Medical School?

Medical school can be a daunting idea, even to premed students. Years of intense studying and practical application of skills prepare hopeful doctors for their professional lives, but what does it take to train a doctor? The answer's pretty straightforward: lots of science classes. From Anatomy to Immunology, the medical school curriculum is a fascinating pursuit of knowledge as it relates to caring for the human body.
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Life

Difference Between "Quote" and "Quotation": What Is the Right Word?

Often the words quote and quotation are used interchangeably. Quote is a verb and quotation is a noun. As A. A. Milne put it in a humorous note: "A quotation is a handy thing to have about, saving one the trouble of thinking for oneself, always a laborious business."According to the Oxford Dictionary, the word quotation is defined as, "A group of words taken from a text or speech and repeated by someone other than the original author or speaker.
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Life

Hispanic Surnames: Meanings, Origins and Naming Practices

Does your last name fall into this list of the 100 most common Hispanic surnames? For additional Spanish surname meanings and origins, see Spanish Surname Meanings, 1-50. Continue reading below this list of common Hispanic surnames to learn about Hispanic naming customs, including why most Hispanics have two last names and what those names represent.
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Life

'The Catcher in the Rye' Overview

The Catcher in the Rye , by J.D. Salinger, is one of the most well-known coming-of-age novels in American literature. Through the first-person narrative of teenager Holden Caulfield, the novel explores modern alienation and the loss of innocence. Fast Facts: The Catcher in the Rye Author: J.D. Salinger Publisher: Little, Brown and Company Year Published: 1951 Genre: Fiction Type of Work: Novel Original Language: English Themes: Alienation, innocence, death Characters : Holden Caulfield, Phoebe Caulfield, Ackley, Stradlater, Allie Caulfield Fun Fact: J.
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Life

How Pearls Form and Which Species Makes Them

The pearls you may wear in earrings and necklaces are the result of an irritant under the shell of a living organism. Pearls are formed by saltwater or freshwater mollusks-a diverse group of animals that includes oysters, mussels, clams, conchs, and gastropods. How Do Mollusks Make Pearls? Pearls are formed when an irritant, such as a bit of food, a grain of sand, bacteria, or even a piece of the mollusk's mantle becomes trapped in the mollusk.
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Life

First Meetings and Introductions in Japanese

Learn how to meet and introduce yourself in Japanese. Grammar Wa (は) is a particle which is like English prepositions but always comes after nouns. Desu (です) is a topic marker and can be translated as "is" or "are". It also acts as an equal sign. Watashi wa Yuki desu. 私はゆきです。 - I am Yuki.
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Life

Science Fair Experiment Ideas: Food and Cooking Chemistry

Some of the safest and most interesting science fair projects involve the foods we eat. Food chemistry projects have the advantage of using materials that are readily available and generally nontoxic. A Few Ideas Think about ways you can explore questions related to food and cooking, and use these questions to help trigger more food chemistry ideas.
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Life

Structure of a Descriptive Essay

The descriptive essay can be arranged in one of many organization patterns, and you will soon find that one style is best for your particular topic. Some effective organization patterns for a descriptive essay are spatial, which is best used when you are describing a location; chronological organization, which is best used when you are describing an event; and functional organization, which is best used when you are describing how a device or process works.
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Life

All About Boas

Boas (Boidae) are a group of nonvenomous snakes that include about 36 species. Boas are found in North America, South America, Africa, Madagascar, Europe and many Pacific Islands. Boas include the largest of all living snakes, the green anaconda. Other Snakes Called Boas The name boa is also used for two groups of snakes that do not belong to the Boidae family, the split-jawed boas (Bolyeriidae) and the dwarf boas (Tropidophiidae).
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Life

Syntactic Ambiguity

In English grammar, syntactic ambiguity ( also called structural ambiguity or grammatical ambiguity) is the presence of two or more possible meanings within a single sentence or sequence of words, as opposed to lexical ambiguity, which is the presence of two or more possible meanings within a single word.
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Life

What Did You Do This Summer?

When answering a college interview question about your summer activities, no one is expecting you to be busy every day of the year. Summer is indeed a time to recoup after a busy academic year. Students who treat summer like an 80-hour-a-week job are setting themselves up for burn-out. That said, your interviewer will want to see that you did something productive in the summer.
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Life

10 Interview Questions You Can Ask the Interviewer

Most interviews end with the age-old, “So, do you have any questions for me?” If you're tempted to say, “Nope, I think you've covered everything, thanks for your time," stop right there. Don't do it. This is asking not to get hired! It's tantamount to saying, “Well, nothing you said in this interview really interested me in the slightest, so I think I'll just move onto the next firm, see ya.
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Life

What is a Main Clause in English Grammar?

For a sentence to be complete, rather than a fragment, it must include a main clause. In English grammar, a main clause (also known as in independent clause, superordinate clause, or base clause) is a group of words made up of a subject and a predicate that together express a complete concept. To write sentences effectively, a writer must decide which information to include in the main clause and which to relegate to dependent clauses.
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Life

Anyone vs. Any One: How to Choose the Right Word

The indefinite pronoun "anyone"-used as a single word-refers to any person at all, but not to any particular individual. "Any one"-used as two words-is an adjective phrase that refers to any single member of a group of either people or things. "Any one" is commonly followed by the preposition "of." A similar distinction applies to "anybody" vs.
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Life

Forming the Future Tense of Spanish

The future tense of Spanish is probably the easiest conjugation pattern of all to learn. Not only is its use much as in English, but its formation is irregular for far fewer verbs than with the other tenses and is the same for all three infinitive endings ( -ar , -er and -ir ). As you would expect, the future tense is typically used for verbs whose action will take place sometime in the future.
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Life

More About the Future in Spanish

If you think that the future tense in Spanish is used to talk about events that will happen in the future, you're only partly right. For the Spanish future tense also has two other uses, one of which corresponds to an English usage and one that does not. And if you think that the only way of talking about the future in Spanish is to use the future tense, you'd be mistaken.
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