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Molecules and Moles in Chemistry

Molecules and moles are important to understand when studying chemistry and physical science. Here's an explanation of what these terms mean, how they relate to Avogadro's number, and how to use them to find molecular and formula weight. Molecules A molecule is a combination of two or more atoms that are held together by chemical bonds, such as covalent bonds and ionic bonds.
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What Is a College Transcript?

In essence, your college transcript is your school's documentation of your academic performance. Your transcript will list your classes, grades, credit hours, major(s), minor(s), and other academic information, depending on what your institution decides is most important. It will also list the times you were taking classes (think "Spring 2014," not "Monday/Wednesday/Friday at 10:30 a.
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The History of Toasters, From Roman Times to Today

Toasting began as a method of prolonging the life of bread. It was initially toasted over open fires with tools to hold it in place until it was properly browned. Toasting was a very common activity in Roman times; "tostum" is the Latin word for scorching or burning. As the Romans traveled throughout Europe vanquishing their foes in early times, it's said that they took their toasted bread right along with them.
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Dean Koontz Book List

Dean Koontz went from being the quintessential struggling writer to dominating the suspense thriller genre with works in the fields of horror, fantasy, science fiction, and mystery. He was hardly an overnight success, but his long list of works is evidence of his popularity and longevity. In time, many of his novels were released as big-screen movies.
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Profiling Passengers Pros and Cons

The threat of terrorism has made airport security measures a hot topic since 9/11. While passengers face ever-longer lists of prohibited items, security experts increasingly argue that it is passengers themselves, not the contents of their bags, that need to be scrutinized. Those in the air travel business may agree, as the time and inconvenience of getting through airport security grows, making air travel unattractive to customers.
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How to Make Game of Thrones Wildfire

Wildfire is the fictional green green substance used in George R. R. Martin's epic fantasy world to immolate foes when dragon fire isn't handy and swords just aren't enough. According to the HBO Game of Thrones series, the liquid burns in the presence of urine and "burns so hot it melts wood, stone…even steel…and, of course, flesh!
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How to Introduce Yourself in Spanish

No matter how little Spanish you know, it's easy to introduce yourself to someone who speaks Spanish. Here are three ways you can do it: Introduce Yourself: Method 1 Simply follow these steps, and you'll be well on your way to making a connection with someone even if that person doesn't speak your language: To say hello or hi, merely say " Hola " or "OH-la" (rhymes with "Lola"; note that the letter h is silent in Spanish).
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Mollusk Facts

Mollusks ( Mollusca) is a taxonomic phylum that contains a diverse array of organisms, including snails, sea slugs, octopuses, squid, and bivalves such as clams, mussels, and oysters. Between 50,000 and 200,000 species are estimated to belong to this phylum. Imagine the obvious differences between an octopus and a clam, and you'll get an idea of the diversity among mollusks.
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10 Facts About Corals

If you've ever visited an aquarium or gone snorkeling when on holiday, you're probably familiar with a wide variety of corals. You may even know that corals play a fundamental role in defining the structure of marine reefs, the most complex and diverse ecosystems in our planet's oceans. But what many don't realize is that these creatures, which resemble a cross between colorful rocks and various bits of seaweed, are in fact animals.
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Katharine Lee Bates

Katharine Lee Bates, a poet, scholar, educator, and writer, is known for writing "America the Beautiful" lyrics. She's also known, though less widely, as a prolific poet and for her scholarly works of literary criticism, A professor of English and head of the English Department at Wellesley College who had been a student there in her earlier years, Bates was a pioneer faculty member helping build Wellesley's reputation and thereby the reputation of women's higher education.
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What Are Compound Subjects in English Grammar?

A compound subject is a subject made up of two or more simple subjects that are joined by a coordinating conjunction (such as and or or ) and that have the same predicate. The parts of a compound subject may also be joined by correlative conjunctions, such as both…and and not only…but also . Although both parts of a compound subject share the same verb, that verb is not always plural.
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What to Expect During a Grad School Interview

Knowing what to expect during a grad school interview is key to effectively answering the questions you're asked. Graduate school acceptance rates in 2017 were approximately 22% for doctoral programs and 50% for master's degree programs, according to the Council of Graduate Schools. The interview is your opportunity to show the admissions committee the person you are beyond test scores, grades, and portfolios.
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Why Is a Mole in Chemistry Called a Mole?

A mole is an important unit in chemistry. Do you know the mole got its name? No, it's not named for the burrowing animal! Here is the answer to why a mole is called a mole. Key Takeaways: How the Mole Units Got Its Name The mole is a unit used in chemistry that is equal to Avogadro's number. It is the number of carbon atoms in 12 grams of the isotope carbon-12.
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Why a Coffee Power Nap Works

You're tired, but you don't have time to really sleep. Rather than taking a power nap or grabbing a cup of coffee, try taking a coffee power nap. Here's what a coffee power nap is and why it actually leaves you feeling more refreshed and awake than either a power nap or a cup of coffee or even a nap followed by coffee.
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Eliot Ness: The Agent who Brought Down Al Capone

Eliot Ness (April 19, 1903 - May 16, 1957) was a U.S. special agent in charge of enforcing prohibition in Chicago, IL. He is best known for leading a squad of special agents, nicknamed “The Untouchables,” which was responsible for the capture, arrest, and ultimate incarceration of Italian mobster Al Capone.
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What Kind of Libertarian Are You?

According to the Libertarian Party's website, "As Libertarians, we seek a world of liberty; a world in which all individuals are sovereign over their own lives and no one is forced to sacrifice his or her values for the benefit of others." This sounds simple, but there are many types of libertarianism.
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Excerpts From Five Malcolm X Speeches

Controversial. Witty. Eloquent. These are some of the ways African-American activist and former Nation of Islam spokesman Malcolm X was described before and after his death in 1965. One of the reasons Malcolm X developed a reputation as a firebrand who intimidated whites and middle-of-the-road blacks is largely because of the provocative comments he made in interviews and speeches.
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Biography of Malcolm X, Black Nationalist and Civil Rights Activitist

Malcolm X (May 19, 1925-February 21, 1965) was a prominent figure during the Civil Rights era. Offering an alternative view to the mainstream Civil Rights movement, Malcolm X advocated for both the establishment of a separate black community (rather than integration) and the use of violence in self-defense (rather than non-violence).
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When Spanish Words Become Our Own

Rodeo, pronto, taco, enchilada - English or Spanish? The answer, of course, is both. For English, like most languages, has expanded over the years through assimilation of words from other tongues. As people of different languages intermingle, inevitably some of the words of one language become words of the other.
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Polar Bond Definition and Examples (Polar Covalent Bond)

Chemical bonds may be classified as being either polar or nonpolar. The difference is how the electrons in the bond are arranged. Polar Bond Definition A polar bond is a covalent bond between two atoms where the electrons forming the bond are unequally distributed. This causes the molecule to have a slight electrical dipole moment where one end is slightly positive and the other is slightly negative.
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