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Thermal Inversion
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Thermal Inversion

Temperature inversion layers, also called thermal inversions or just inversion layers, are areas where the normal decrease in air temperature with increasing altitude is reversed and the air above the ground is warmer than the air below it. Inversion layers can occur anywhere from close to ground level up to thousands of feet into the atmosphere.

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Timeline of US-North Korean Relations

Take a look at the US-North Korean relationship from 1950 to the present. 1950-1953 War The Korean War was fought on the Korean Peninsula between the Chinese supported forces in the north and the American supported, United Nations forces in the south. 1953 Ceasefire Open warfare stops with a ceasefire agreement on July 27.
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The Meaning of the Title: "The Catcher in the Rye"

The Catcher in the Rye is a 1951 novel by American author J. D. Salinger. Despite some controversial themes and language, the novel and its protagonist Holden Caulfield have become favorites among teen and young adult readers. In the decades since its publication, The Catcher in the Rye has become one of the most popular "coming of age" novels.
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Seesaw Candle Fire Magic Trick

The seesaw candle magic trick is a fire science trick that teaches how combustion and Newton's Third Law of Motion work. A candle, balanced between a pair of glasses, rocks or seesaws up and down on its own. The motion continues as long as the candle continues to burn. If one side of the candle starts out heavier than the other, the motion of the candle will act to equalize the mass on either side of the pivot point.
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Properties of Metamorphic Rocks

Metamorphic rocks are the third great class of rocks. They occur when sedimentary and igneous rocks become changed, or metamorphosed, by conditions underground. The four main agents that metamorphose rocks are heat, pressure, fluids, and strain. These agents can act and interact in an almost infinite variety of ways.
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21 Quotes About Anti-Feminism

Opposition to feminism has existed since the founding of the movement, and continues today. Everyone from the founder of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud to talk radio host Rush Limbaugh has weighed in. Eagle Forum founder Phyllis Schlafly gets her own section. Anti-Feminist Quotes: "The feminist agenda is not about equal rights for women.
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Using Ethnomethodology to Understand Social Order

What Is Ethnomethodology? Ethnomethodology is a theoretical approach in sociology based on the belief that you can discover the normal social order of a society by disrupting it. Ethnomethodologists explore the question of how people account for their behaviors. To answer this question, they may deliberately disrupt social norms to see how people respond and how they try to restore social order.
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Relative Error Definition (Science)

Relative error is a measure of the uncertainty of measurement compared to the size of the measurement. It's used to put error into perspective. For example, an error of 1 cm would be a lot if the total length is 15 cm, but insignificant if the length was 5 km. Relative error is also known as relative uncertainty or approximation error.
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History of the Fauvism Art Movement

"Fauves! Wild beasts!" Not exactly a flattering way to greet the first Modernists, but this was the critical reaction to a small group of painters exhibiting in the 1905 Salon d'Automme in Paris. Their eye-popping color choices had never before been seen, and to see them all hanging together in the same room was a shock to the system.
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History and Founding of Virginia Colony

In 1607, Jamestown became Great Britain's first settlement in North America, the first foothold of the Virginia Colony. Its permanency came after three failed attempts by Sir Walter Raleigh beginning in 1586 to attempt to establish a stronghold in the land he called Virginia after his queen, Elizabeth I.
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Falling Action in Literature

The falling action in a work of literature is the sequence of events that follow the climax and end in the resolution. The falling action is the opposite of the rising action, which leads up to the plot's climax. Five-Part Story Structure Traditionally, there are five segments to any given plot: exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution.
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Astronomy 101: Exploring the Outer Solar System

Our final lesson in this part of Astronomy 101 will concentrate primarily on the outer solar system, including two gas giants; Jupiter, Saturn and the two ice giant planets Uranus, and Neptune. There's also Pluto, which is a dwarf planet, as well as other distant small worlds that remain unexplored. Jupiter , the fifth planet from the Sun, is also the largest in our solar system.
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Ostrich Egg Shells

The broken pieces of ostrich egg shells (often abbreviated OES in the literature) are commonly found on Middle and Upper Paleolithic sites throughout the world: at the time ostriches were much more widespread than they are today, and indeed were one of several megafaunal species which experienced mass extinctions at the end of the Pleistocene.
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Calculating Enthalpy Changes Using Hess's Law

Hess's Law, also known as "Hess's Law of Constant Heat Summation," states that the total enthalpy of a chemical reaction is the sum of the enthalpy changes for the steps of the reaction. Therefore, you can find enthalpy change by breaking a reaction into component steps that have known enthalpy values.
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Biography of Anne Frank, Writer of Powerful Wartime Diary

Anne Frank (born Annelies Marie Frank; June 12, 1929-March 1945) was a Jewish teenager who spent two years hiding in a Secret Annex in Nazi-occupied Amsterdam during World War II. While she died in the Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp at age 15, her father survived and found and published Anne's diary.
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Prohibition Era Timeline

The Prohibition era was a period in the United States, lasting from 1920 to 1933, when the production, transportation, and sale of alcohol was outlawed. This period began with the passage of the 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and was the culmination of decades of temperance movements. However, the era of Prohibition was not to last very long, for the 18th Amendment was repealed 13 years later with the passage of the 21st Amendment.
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Understanding Which Metabolic Pathways Produce ATP in Glucose

It's important to know how many ATP, or adenosine triphosphate, are produced per glucose molecule by various metabolic pathways, such as the Krebs cycle, fermentation, glycolysis, electron transport, and chemiosmosis. Take a look at how many net ATP are produced per pathway and which yields the most ATP per glucose.
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Quotes From "Napoleon Dynamite"

Quotes from Napoleon Dynamite have been hugely liked by many quotation lovers. If you do not follow the sense of humor, you need to watch the movie and then read these quotes. It is quite likely that you will not only find them stupid, but very likable. Deb & Uncle Rico (Deb, while taking a picture of Uncle Rico) Deb: Okay, turn your head on more of a slant…(heads turn in a slant) Deb: Now, make a fist.
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The 4 Most Abundant Gases in Earth's Atmosphere

The most abundant gases in Earth's atmosphere depend on the region of the atmosphere and other factors. Since the chemical composition of the atmosphere depends on temperature, altitude, and proximity to water. Usually, the 4 most abundant gases are: Nitrogen (N 2 ) - 78.084% Oxygen (O 2 ) - 20.9476% Argon (Ar) - 0.
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How Much Does Medical School Cost?

Everyone knows that medical school is expensive - but exactly how much is it? Beyond the cost of tuition and fees, prospective medical students must also consider housing, transportation, food, and other costs. By planning ahead and analyzing your finances before you start medical school, you'll improve your chances of graduating with the least amount of debt.
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African Americans in the Progressive Era

The Progressive Era spanned the years from 1890-1920 when the United States was experiencing rapid growth. Immigrants from eastern and southern Europe arrived in droves. Cities were overcrowded, and those living in poverty suffered greatly. Politicians in the major cities controlled their power through various political machines.
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